jumping gene

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jumping gene

[¦jəmp·iŋ ¦jēn]
(genetics)
A mobile genetic entity, such as a transposon.
References in periodicals archive ?
Jumping genes are also of huge importance in science and medicine.
Like many jumping genes, the P-element has two short, mirror-image sequences at either end, which are thought to facilitate a splicing reaction with the host's DNA; the host cell papers over the gaps with complementary DNA code.
Transposons, or jumping genes, are bits of DNA that can move or "transpose" themselves to new positions within an organism's genome.
Jumping genes - also called transposons - are sequences of DNA that move to different areas of the genome within the same cell.
Jumping genes - also called transposons - are sequences of DNA that can move or jump to different areas of the genome within the same cell, and can be a rare cause of certain diseases like hemophilia and Duchenne muscular dystrophy.
Scientists estimate that jumping genes or "transposable elements" account for at least 50 percent of the human genome, and retrotransposons are by far the most common type.
The viroidal complementary DNA can function as jumping genes producing a dynamic genome important in storage of synaptic information, HLA gene expression and developmental gene expression.
In this edition of Traffic, we see how a single blue dot found near the brain of a fruitfly larva changed the course of Henry Chung's PhD research from the study of jumping genes and regulation of a single gene to the expressional characterisation of the entire family of genes.
Half a century ago, Nobel laureate plant geneticist Dr Barbara McClintock identified two such jumping genes in maize.
This includes mobile elements called jumping genes that have the ability to copy (or cut) and paste themselves into new locations of the genome.
These findings take us closer, for example, to more precisely predicting the changes a drought-resistant jumping gene from one plant put into another may cause to the DNA.