jumping gene

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jumping gene

[¦jəmp·iŋ ¦jēn]
(genetics)
A mobile genetic entity, such as a transposon.
References in periodicals archive ?
Scientists estimate that jumping genes or "transposable elements" account for at least 50 percent of the human genome, and retrotransposons are by far the most common type.
Because repression of a jumping gene also affects genes located near it on the chromosome, the researchers suspect that these repressors have been co-opted for other gene-regulatory functions, and that those other functions have persisted and evolved long after the jumping genes the repressors originally turned off have degraded due to the accumulation of random mutations.
However, recent discoveries have shown that jumping genes do not always play a negative role in shaping the genome.
Jumping genes are also of huge importance in science and medicine.
Rare striped roses such as the mediaeval red-and-white striped Rosa mundii, and the modern red-and-yellow striped `Harry Wheatcroft' are well known examples of jumping genes that modify genes for petal pigment.
Transposons, or jumping genes, are bits of DNA that can move or "transpose" themselves to new positions within an organism's genome.
Washington, June 2 (ANI): Jumping genes provide extensive 'raw material' for evolution, an American study has shown.
Retrotransposons, also called jumping genes, duplicate themselves and insert the copies into random places in DNA.
Washington, June 12 (ANI): Challenging standard assumptions about mobile DNA, or the so-called jumping genes, scientists have found that such genes do most of their jumping not during the development of sperm and egg cells, but during the development of the embryo itself.
Perhaps one day our methods will contain artificial analogs of DNA, RNA, jumping genes, inverted segments, and a host of other genetic paraphernalia," Goldberg writes in his book Genetic Algorithms in Search, Optimization, and Machine Learning (1989, Addison-Wesley).
This color change also involved a third gene, which apparently activated the jumping gene.