Juridical Fact

Juridical Fact

 

a circumstance that, through a legal norm, establishes, changes, or terminates legal relations. In many cases, the basis for rights and duties is a complex set of facts.

Juridical facts are divided into two categories: events and acts. Events are circumstances occurring independently of human will, such as earthquakes or the expiration of a time limit. Acts, on the other hand, are circumstances occurring through human will. Acts may be legal (observance of the law by citizens, application of the law by state bodies, judicial decisions, and transactions) or illegal (crimes, administrative and disciplinary violations, and violations of civil law).

References in periodicals archive ?
That's just a juridical fact. Try reconciling the original three disqualifiers with the final five disqualifiers with the recent half-disqualification, half-not and, well, you can't.
For the master, the "primordial juridical fact" is that he has no duties and a plenitude of rights toward his slave; for the slave, it is that he has no rights but a multitude of obligations toward his master.(89)
As acts of exercising rights, i.e., juridical facts resulting in consequences for the disputing parties, ECHR decisions are to be implemented according to Article 46 of the Convention.