Ribera

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Ribera

Jos? de also called Jusepe de Ribera, Italian nickname Lo Spagnoletto (The Little Spaniard). 1591--1652, Spanish artist, living in Italy. His religious pictures often dwell on horrible suffering, presented in realistic detail
References in periodicals archive ?
Unlike other Pelican volumes, the history of Spanish Renaissance and Baroque painting is told as a continuous narrative rather than as a series of biographies of the artists (with the exceptions of El Greco and Jusepe de R ibera).
Jusepe de Ribera's ``Adoration of the Magi'' (about 1620).
Jusepe de Ribera was born in Spain in 1591 and moved to Italy at a young age.
Despite his studies in Paris, he was most influenced by 17th-century Dutch and Spanish painters, particularly Diego Velazquez and Jusepe de Ribera.
Painting is well represented: Munich-based Kunkel Fine Art offers the enigmatic oil Luzifer (1890) by Franz von Stuck, a leading figure in the Symbolist movement, while Colnaghi impresses with a Jusepe de Ribera canvas of St Jude.
Part of a contemporary movement rooted in the traditions of 17th-century Spanish realism, Lopez Garcia, Claudio Bravo, Bernando Torrens, Francisco Roa, and many others have drawn inspiration from the meticulous work of Francisco de Zurbaran, Jusepe de Ribera, and Diego Velasquez to create their own naturalist style (2).
In stark contrast are the portraits here, which veer towards the sober and classical--not least Jusepe de Ribera's unpublished portrait of the Count of Monterrey robed as a Knight of Santiago and a recent acquisition, Daniele Crespi's Portrait of a Gentleman with a Clock.
Frames are very important to me,' Pizzi says, delighting in his extraordinary luck in finding the perfect companion for a recent acquisition, a small oil on copper of Christ Crowned with Thorns signed and dated by Jusepe de Ribera (Fig.
His favourite among a group of half-length--and half-clad --aged saints with sagging flesh, either by or after Jusepe de Ribera, is a St Andrew of around 1619 (Fig.
Jusepe de Ribera escaped to Naples in 1616 to avoid his creditors, becoming one of the leading painters in the city.
Franits correctly stresses the importance to Van Baburen of the young Jusepe de Ribera, whose stay in Rome has now been pinned down to 1612-16.
25) The only exceptions were Spain and Latin America, where Bartolome Esteban Murillo reintroduced La Barbera's waifish brunette in the 1670s--an irony since three of the Sicilian Rosalies ended up in Spanish collections, and Jusepe de Ribera borrowed one of Van Dyck's models for his Assumption of Mary Magdalene (1636) and Apotheosis of Januarius (1635).