Rufus Wheeler Peckham

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Peckham, Rufus Wheeler

(pĕk`əm), 1838–1909, associate justice of the U.S. Supreme Court (1895–1909), b. Albany, N.Y. Admitted (1859) to the bar, he became a leading Albany lawyer and was prominent in local Democratic politics. He served on the state supreme court (1883–86) and on the state court of appeals (1886–95) before he was appointed by President Grover Cleveland to the U.S. Supreme Court. A zealous defender of property rights, he ruled in the famous case of Lochner v. New York (1905) that a maximum-hours law was unconstitutional.

Peckham, Rufus Wheeler

(1838–1909) Supreme Court justice; born in Albany, N.Y. He served on New York's supreme court (1883–86) and court of appeals (1886–95). President Grover Cleveland named him to the U.S. Supreme Court (1896–1909) where he wrote almost 400 opinions.
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Justice Peckham did not make this argument in Young (nor did any of
Had Justice Peckham really understood the institution of
Osborn, (64) Justice Peckham gave as further examples of permissible
That is why Justice Peckham concluded that their suit presented no
This is why Justice Peckham could say of Osborn and Young that
Justice Peckham contrasted the wholly negative effect of the
Trans-Missouri Freight Association,(91) Justice Peckham rejected the holding and reasoning of lower court judges who, like most lower federal court judges in cases up to that time, had interpreted the Sherman Act to incorporate common law restraint of trade doctrines.
On appeal, Peritz notes, Justice Peckham rejected such views and instead embraced the outlook of Sherman's congressional camp.
Second, while Justice Peckham continued to declare that the level of prices collectively set by the defendants was doctrinally irrelevant, Peckham went on to note that in any case the prices set by these defendants in fact were unreasonable.
Justice Peckham did not write a separate opinion in Northern Securities, but joined in the dissenting opinions of both Justice White and Justice Holmes.
It thus might have surprised him to be considered, as of 1904-1905, a leading philosophical compatriot of Justice Peckham, with whom he disagreed so sharply in Lochner itself.
Chief Justice Fuller and Justice Peckham each concurred in both of these two dissenting opinions.
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