Justin Martyr


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Justin Martyr

Saint. ?100--?165 ad,Christian apologist and philosopher. Feast day: June 1
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The second century Christian writer Justin Martyr refers to Salome as a [phrase omitted] (pais), which means "child.
Justin Martyr indicates in Dialogue with Trypho 48 that there were Christians even in his day who did not accept the pesher found in the Greek translation of the Hebrew Gospel of Matthew, produced, as Jerome tells us (Lives of Illustrious Men 3), by an unknown translator: "For there are some of our race, my friends, who admit that he is the Anointed One, while holding him to be man of men .
This rather astonishing and seemingly pointless interruption of the story, which sweeps the reader up in the narrator's indignation only to bring it all to a crashing halt, can be explained as a humorous or satiric response to Christian apologists of the second century such as Justin Martyr, Aristides of Athens, and Minucius Felix.
Next follow eight essays, seven dealing with Stoic ethics in New Testament authors and one with the apologist Justin Martyr.
Any serious student of the Septuagint would also do well to read her conclusive refutation of the "abandonment" theory first proposed by Justin Martyr, In his imaginary Dialogue with Trypho, Justin accused the Jews of sponsoring new translations in order to erode confidence in the Septuagint and along with it the textual foundations of Christianity.
In Part 1, "The destiny of the Non-Christian" from the patristic to the contemporary magisterium, Carola starts with the issue of salvation for non-Christians in patristic theology and examines the writings of such major theologians as Justin Martyr, Origen, Eusebius of Caesare, and Augustine of Hippo.
Justin Martyr Parish School, Anaheim, CA, & Doctoral Student at Azusa Pacific University.
Justin Martyr and His Worlds, a collection of 14 papers, plus timeline, map, and a list of Justin's writings, emerged from a conference held in Edinburgh in July 2006.
Already in the second century, Justin Martyr was working on the integration of the Christian faith with classical learning, including the philosophy of Socrates and Plato.
Justin Martyr believed the Divine Word (logos) to be partially present in some of the Greek philosophers.
However, his line of succession from the "rabbi Jesus" to a conflicted apostle Paul to early Christian figures like Justin Martyr leaves out the fact that the seeds of replacement theology--the notion that the promises made to Israel in the Old Testament are now transferred to the Christian Church--are to be found in Jesus' own preaching, notably the parables of the wedding feast and of the vineyard in Matthew's Gospel.
This malignant theology that derived from Patristic interpretations of the New Testament, was augmented by the Church Fathers such as Justin Martyr and John Chrysostom and most especially by Augustine, the greatest of the early Christian theologians.