Juvenalia


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Juvenalia

 

in ancient Rome, a holiday established by the emperor Nero and celebrated with games and theatrical presentations in honor of Juventas, the goddess of youth. According to the Roman historian Tacitus, celebrations of the holiday were marked by extreme licentiousness.

Juvenalia

Three days in June
During the Juvenalia festival each year in Krakow, Poland, the students of Jagiellonian University take over the city for three days. After the mayor hands over the keys to the city, they dress up in costumes and masks and parade through the streets making fun of anything they choose. This celebration goes back to a medieval tradition, when new students at the university had to pay a tax to older ones as part of their ritual entry into college life—much like the "hazing" that goes on in fraternities and sororities at American colleges.
CONTACTS:
Polish National Tourist Office
5 Marine View Plz.
Hoboken, NJ 07030
201-420-9910; fax: 201-584-9153
www.polandtour.org
SOURCES:
BkHolWrld-1986, Jun 4
References in periodicals archive ?
El capitulo es asi clave para entender el resto del estudio y se preve sera altamente ilustrativo para los academicos que poco a poco, pero cada vez mas, estudian la juvenalia lorquiana.
Byrne, a collection largely of Mahfouz's juvenalia.
They arrange the citations in sections on vampires and vampirism: general sources, folklore and history, literature, vampires on stage and screen, vampires on television, vampires in music and art, the metaphorical vampire, the contemporary vampire subculture, and juvenalia.
also relates an account on the authority of the boy's tutor, Ibn Faris al-Qazwini, recounting Aba 1-Facll's delight at the comportment of his son and his literary juvenalia.
The dissonance of OFR with Aristotle's reproductive theory does not preclude its being part of Aristotle's juvenalia which, for some reason, has been incorporated into the corpus completely unrevised; however, it seems far more likely that the author is someone other than Aristotle.
In Jane Austen's Beginnings: The Juvenalia and Lady Susan, edited by J.
William Thackeray, Burlesques from Cornhill to Cairo and Juvenalia (London 1903), p.
Teddy will be up for sale on May 19 in Bonhams' sale of Fine Teddy Bears and Juvenalia in Knightsbridge.
In her first meeting with Associate Professor Yamada, who is going to supervise her, she explains that she plans to read all Austen's works chronologically from the Juvenalia and that she has already read Sense and Sensibility and Northanger Abbey.
And though Dido is often discounted as Marlovian juvenalia, it was available to Conrad, a bibliophile, in three important and popular nineteenth-century editions of Marlowe's works.
Nevertheless, it is Tennyson's sonnet "As When We Muse and Brood," also first published in the 1832 Poems, and republished as Juvenalia in 1872, that may have been a model for the as/so sonnets of Rossetti.
I suppose you heard about the loss of my Juvenalia [sic]?