Kaifeng

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Kaifeng

(kī-fŭng), city (1994 est. pop. 535,300), NE Henan prov., China, on the Longhai RR. It is a commercial, agricultural, and industrial center. Manufactures include agricultural machinery, zinc, textiles, fertilizer, chemicals, and processed foods. The Huang He (Yellow River), just to the north, has frequently flooded the city. Kaifeng has often been a major center of Chinese political and cultural life. Founded in the 3d cent. B.C., it was, as Bianliang, capital of the Five Dynasties (906–59) and then capital of the northern Sung dynasty (960–1127). Zoroastrians worshiped there, and in the 12th cent. a Jewish colony was established. The city fell to the Mongols in the 13th cent. Kaifeng was the provincial capital until superseded (1954) by Zhengzhou.

K’aifeng

 

a city in eastern China, in the province of Honan on the Great China Plain just south of the Huangho. Population, 289, 000 (1959). The city is a transportation junction. Its industries include machine-building, chemicals, textiles (cotton), and food. There are numerous institutions of higher learning. K’ai-feng is one of the oldest cities in the country; from 960 to 1127 it was the imperial capital. The city is laid out in a rectangle, enclosed by a fortified wall with four gates. There are remains of a 12th-century palace and the 13-tier T’ieh-Ta Pagoda (the “Iron Pagoda,” 1041), as well as the Honan provincial museum.

Kaifeng

a city in E China, in N Henan on the Yellow River: one of the oldest cities in China and its capital (as Pien-liang) from 907 to 1126. Pop.: 810 000 (2005 est.)
References in periodicals archive ?
K'ai-feng is represented as a metropolis bustling with sound and color, and a citizenry exuberant and insouciant, totally given to the pleasure of the senses.
Nearly all of them were taken forcibly to the Jurchen home base in the north along with other spoils of war when the main force of the conquerors withdrew from K'ai-feng.
Right after the winter solstice of the previous year the K'ai-feng prefect had a decorated scaffold erected opposite Hsun-te Hall of the palace compound.
Sure enough, just forty years after Ssu-ma Kuang's death, the Jurchen soldiers were at the gates of K'ai-feng.
The illusion of timelessness of life in K'ai-feng is carefully maintained in the text by the unobtrusiveness of the narrator and by the refusal to state or even hint anywhere in the book--except in the Preface--that great changes have taken place.
In contrast to other reminiscences of K'ai-feng written by Meng Yuan-lao's contemporaries, in poetry and in short essays, Tung-Ching meng hua lu employs no double frames of time or a multiple perspective except in the Preface.
Had Meng Yuan-lao chosen to narrate just a few vignettes of life in K'ai-feng by adopting the format of pi-chi (collection of miscellaneous notes), he could have used the first-person narrative and related his own experience.
Without these innovations his remembrances of K'ai-feng could not have been registered so fully, with such color and vividness.
A connoisseur of popular literature and presumably a habitue of the fleshpots of K'ai-feng, Meng Yuan-lao must have heard the singing of such lyrics a thousand times.
He gives only the barest reference to the National University, and none whatever to its students, whose huge demonstrations and fervent protests during the crisis of 1126-27--at one time more than one hundred thousand citizens of K'ai-feng joined the students in blocking the palace gates--foreshadowed what was to come in Tiananmen Square in another capital.
We might also ask, Would he still have written a most memorable book about K'ai-feng had he learned to write a more classical prose and pursued a more conventional career?