KEE


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KEE

Knowledge Engineering Environment. Frame-based expert system. Supports dynamic inheritance, multiple inheritance, polymorphism. Classes, meta-classes and objects are all treated alike. A class is an instance of a meta-class. Can control rules for merging of each field when multiple inheritance takes place. Methods are written in LISP. Actions may be triggered when fields are accessed or modified. Extensive GUI integrates with objects. Can easily make object updates to be reflected on display or display selections to update fields. This can in turn trigger other methods or inference rules which may then update other parts of the display. Intellicorp, for TI Explorer. "The Role of Frame-Based Representation in Reasoning", R. Fikes et al, CACM 28(9):904- 920 (Sept 1985).
References in periodicals archive ?
One of the boys told me I had a good voice and that I should get lessons," Kees said.
However, the authorization documents evolved because of KEES restructuring that resulted from prohibitive deployment and distribution costs.
We stand on the edge and I wait at this elevation with Kees who wrote
On top of producing an excellent and highly readable book, Rooney does the world of poetry a service by bringing the work of the almost-forgotten Weldon Kees back into the eye of the discerning reader.
Kees paid tribute to Philip and said: "He was an enterprising man, and a very funny man.
Earlier this year a new Dutch embassy opened its doors, designed by the Dutch partnership of Felix Claus and Kees Kaan, whose rigorous, rational architecture is a soothing antidote to the current excesses of their fellow countrymen.
Kinder Bruin Fine Arts presents a New Zealand artist and first-time exhibitor, Kees Bruin, who creates works that synthesize traditional realism with contemporary and photo-realistic techniques, intriguing and teasing the viewer with tenuous play between the real and the symbolic.
Kees was forty-one when he leapt to his death from the Golden Gate Bridge in 1955.
When the University of Nebraska Press sent my review copy of the Selected Short Stories of Weldon Kees with a note asking that I please accept the book with the compliments of the author, I laughed out loud--not because I'd be ungrateful to receive his well-wishes, but rather because nobody has seen or heard from the man in almost fifty years.