KGB


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KGB:

see secret policesecret police,
policing organization operating in secrecy for the political purposes of its government, often with terroristic procedures. The Nature of a Secret Police
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KGB

the Committee of State Security, USSR agency (begun 1954) with responsibility for espionage and counter–espionage. [EB, V; 780]
See: Spying
References in periodicals archive ?
The State Security Department stores the documents of former KGB collaborators who have admitted their past.
Mitrokhin's documents indicate that Granot was recruited just before the Six-Day War by senior KGB officer Yuri Kotov, and contact with him was cut when the Soviet Union severed diplomatic relations with Israel after the 1967 war.
There's a group of summaries or excerpts there that all come under a headline of persons cultivated by the KGB in the year 1983," he said.
Ever since Russia has been living with the dire consequences of allowing a career KGB man to run the country.
He admits he could be wrong, but thinks a rogue element in the KGB is more plausible than Mafia-CIA-Military-Industrial-Complex, and everyone else besides, hypotheses, the paper said.
For another American, his contacts with the KGB were more intimate.
After a year of honest presswork to assume his disguise, Vassiliev went to work for the KGB until the agency was shut down by the collapse of the Soviet Union.
In the case of the KGB records, Vassiliev was only permitted to take notes, not reproduce documents, at a location remote from the KGB archives, using materials selected by Russian intelligence officials.
In their luridly named new book, Spies, the historians John Earl Haynes and Harvey Klehr join the former KGB agent Alexander Vassiliev in charging that Stone was guilty of "cooperation with the KGB [then operating under a different name]" during the period 1936-1939.
Crain's reported in September 2008 that KGB signed a 10-year lease for about 13,400 square feet on the third floor of the building, where asking rents were $99 per square foot.
Unfortunately, however, the KGB got wind of the plan.
The files--which include secret directives sent from Moscow to KGB headquarters in Lithuania, Latvia, and Estonia--reveal the former Soviet police agency's clandestine operations.