Kim


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Kim

orphan wanders streets of India with lama. [Br. Lit.: Kim]
References in classic literature ?
There was some justification for Kim - he had kicked Lala Dinanath's boy off the trunnions - since the English held the Punjab and Kim was English.
If the woman had sent Kim up to the local Jadoo-Gher with those papers, he would, of course, have been taken over by the Provincial Lodge, and sent to the Masonic Orphanage in the Hills; but what she had heard of magic she distrusted.
The big Punjabi grinned tolerantly: he knew Kim of old.
'Thy father was a pastry-cook, Thy mother stole the ghi" sang Kim. 'All Mussalmans fell off Zam-Zammah long ago!'
He stopped; for there shuffled round the corner, from the roaring Motee Bazar, such a man as Kim, who thought he knew all castes, had never seen.
'Without doubt.' returned Kim; 'but he is no man of India that I have ever seen.'
'Send him hither,' said Kim, dropping from Zam-Zammah, flourishing his bare heels.
'The Ajaib-Gher, the Wonder House!' Kim gave him no title - such as Lala or Mian.
'A guru from Tibet,' said Kim. 'I have not seen such a man.
Kim. 'That is the Government's house and there is no idolatry in it, but only a Sahib with a white beard.
Kim clicked round the self-registering turnstile; the old man followed and halted amazed.
With longer stories he is generally less successful; 'Kim,' however, has much power.