Kabylia

Kabylia

 

the general name for the strongly dissected mountain massifs on the Mediterranean coast in Algeria, between Algiers and Annaba. The massifs are composed chiefly of Paleozoic deposits and metamorphosed granite intrusions and have an average elevation of 800–1, 200 m. The region comprises the massifs (from west to east) Grande Kabylie, including the Djurd-jura chain in the south (highest point, 2, 308 m); Petite Kabylie, including the Babor massifs (highest point 2, 004 m); Kabylie de Collo; and Edough.

Kabylia, with an annual precipitation of 800–1, 700 mm, is themost humid region in Algeria. The subtropical evergreen forestshave been preserved only at elevations of more than 1, 200 m. Theinhabitants of the region, a Berber people called Kabyles, arechiefly engaged in agriculture (grain and fruit) and in livestockraising.

References in periodicals archive ?
Her family comes from Kabylia, the home of the Berber people.
Their campaign gets under way today with a game against Kabylia.
Diand composition and prey choice by the House Martin Delichon urbica (Aves: Hirundinidae) during the breeding period in Kabylia, Algeria.
Within the Berber population are various groups from different regions, such as the Kabyles from Kabylia and the Chaoui from Eastern Algeria.
Kabylia is a region in the North of Algeria, part of the Tell Atlas located at the edge of the Mediterranean Sea.
Due to its synfloristical and synecological characteristics, this grassland may correspond to the Dauco hispanici-Asteriscetum maritimi Wojterski 1988 (Wojterski, 1988), mentioned on the coast of Kabylia and the Alger region (Gehu & al, 1992; Khelifi & al, 2008).
For example, in Kabylia, a region of northeastern Algeria with a population of around 7.5 million, the official language is Arabic, but the everyday language spoken is Kabyle, along with some Arabic and French.
Her publications include Village Matters: knowledge, politics and community in Kabylia, Algeria (James Currey, 2009) and Smugglers and Saints of the Sahara: regional connectivity in the twentieth century (Cambridge University Press, 2012).
The Djurdjura Mountainsin Kabylia, Matoub's region, provided refuge forinsurgents.
Only months after the Cremieux Decree, the northern mountainous region of Kabylia witnessed a fierce if brief guerilla uprising led by a local sheikh, Mohamed El-Mokrani.
There are also the long-running demands for Berber independence in the restive Kabylia region, a culturally distinct area in the mountains of northeast Algeria.