Caid

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Caid

 

in Algeria, Tunisia, and Morocco, the representative of central power, the ruler of an individual city, region, tribe, or group of tribes. The caid was usually chosen from the powerful feudal nobility; the institution of the caid existed since the late Middle Ages. In Algeria and Tunisia it was abolished in the 1950’s and early 1960’s.

References in periodicals archive ?
Kaid pleaded guilty at Manchester crown court to robbery and knife charges.
Kaid was always round at my house when we were growing up and we have always been close.
Kaid Mohammed left, donated his kidney to his childhood friend, John Relf, who needed a live kidney donor Richard Williams
Magistrates ordered Kaid, of Church Street in Barnsley, to pay PS1,500 compensation towards the broken window.
The client had a clear vision of the feel he wanted: a corporate look and an interior that would represent the several brands and companies under KAID.
Promising footballer Kaid, 24, was left paralysed after fleeing a nightclub brawl.
Denise, 40, was overwhelmed by the support from Kree, 14, and Kaid, 10, as she endured a mastectomy, chemotherapy and radiotherapy.
The European integration project is suffering from a crisis in legitimacy symptomatically represented by small European Parliament election turnouts and Kaid (telecommunication, U.
The current Handbook of Political Communication Research edited by Lynda Lee Kaid, is the first complete update of that first edition.
Kaid Benfield, Jutka Terris and Nancy Vorsanger cover smart cities, suburbs and conservation, which is where the barriers between wilderness and civilization are breached with new models.
In Once There Were Greenfields, Kaid Benfield and Matt Raimi from the Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC) and Don Chen from the Surface Transportation Policy Project (STPP) discuss the expansion of metropolitan areas, the effects of traffic congestion on communities and the environment, the loss of the physical landscape, and the fiscal impacts of sprawl.