Nimrud

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Related to Kalhu: Hatra

Nimrud:

see CalahCalah
or Kalakh
, ancient city of Assyria, S of Nineveh and therefore S of present Mosul, Iraq. Known as Calah in the Bible, it is the same as the ancient Nimrud, named after a legendary Assyrian hunting hero.
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Nimrud

an ancient city in Assyria, near the present-day city of Mosul (Iraq): founded in about 1250 bc and destroyed by the Medes in 612 bc; excavated by Sir Austen Henry Layard
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
According to him, ' I wish to commiserate with the people of Rabbah Local Government and indeed the entire people of Sokoto State on the loss of our brethren to another bandits attack in Dalijan, Rakkoni and Kalhu communities on Monday night.
This paper brings together the pictorial versions of what may be described as the "Assyrian royal landscape"; that is, outdoor scenery designed for royal purposes and represented on the stone panels that lined the walls of the palaces at the modem sites of Nimrud (Kalhu), Nineveh (Kuyunjik), and Khorsabad (Dur-Sharrukin).
1-32) of a collection of incantations (Rm 376) from Kalhu, first published by Lambert in 1965:
The oldest textual witnesses available originate from Assur and Kalhu, which is unexpected for a decidedly Babylonian text, whereas the youngest exemplars may come from Uruk and Sippar.
The one problem with the edition is probably unavoidable: the decision to publish Tiglath-pileser's annals from Kalhu as a series of thirty-four "texts" (independently surviving sections of different ancient versions of the annals) strung together here like beads to create a hypothetical single document.
In addition, the cities that along with Assur would later comprise the heartland of Assyria--Nineveh, Arbail, and Kalhu or Kilizu--did not constitute a geographical or political unity in this period.
Ninua, Kalhu, and Kilizu, are mentioned as Assyrian provinces in the documentation only from the thirteenth century on.
The book's utility is heightened by copious illustrations and plates (in the captions for plates Ila, IVa, b, Va, VIIb and IXa read "Kalhu") and four indices: a subject index, an index of geographic and gentilic names, an index of personal names, and an extremely useful index to the native terms studied by the various authors.
The incantation tablets, originating from various sites (Nineveh, Assur, Sippar, Uruk, Hama, Babylon, Nippur, Kalhu, and Huzirina) and periods (eighth to second centuries B.C.), are presented in score form followed by translation.
Now that the Assur texts are finally appearing, the major desideratum remains the publication of the Samas-sarru-usur archive unearthed half a century ago in Kalhu. The second part of the book is taken up by a discussion of the different shapes of Neo-Assyrian clay tablets and the ways in which they are inscribed and sealed, based on a personal inspection of hundreds of texts in the British Museum and in Berlin.
Since the presence of "prophets" in Assyria at the temple of Istar in Kalhu is documented as early as the thirteenth century B.C.
From them we learn that Nippur was linked to Babylon; Kalhu, the capital of Assyria; Der; and some Elamite cities.