Kalisz


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Kalisz

(kä`lēsh), Ger. Kalisch, city (1993 est. pop. 106,600), Wielkopolskie prov., central Poland. An industrial center, it has factories producing textiles, clothing, chemicals, aircraft components, and paper. One of the oldest Polish towns, it has been identified as the Slavic settlement of Calissia mentioned in the 2d cent. A.D. by Ptolemy. It flourished as a trade center from the 13th cent. At Kalisz, Casimir III signed (1343) the treaty with the Teutonic Knights by which he conceded his rule over East Pomerania. The city passed to Prussia in 1793, was transferred to Russia in 1815, and was restored to Poland in 1919. In a treaty signed (1813) at Kalisz, Prussia and Russia formed an alliance against Napoleon I.
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The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Kalisz

 

a city in Poland, in Poznań Województwo, on the Prosna River. Population, 82, 000 (1971). Kalisz is a transport junction and a center of the textile industry (silk, velvet, tulle, and knitwear). Other important branches of industry include machine building, food processing, and the manufacture of pianos and plastic goods. Kalisz has existed since the second century A.D.

REFERENCE

Dabrowski, K. Z przesztości Kalisza. Warsaw, 1970.
The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

Kalisz

a town in central Poland, on an island in the Prosna River: textile industry. Pop.: 110 000 (2005 est.)
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
The German sack of Kalisz during the first two weeks of August 1914 became a cause celebre in the Russian press.