Callisthenes

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Callisthenes

(kəlĭs`thənēz), c.360–c.327 B.C., Greek historian of Olynthus; nephew of Aristotle. He accompanied Alexander the Great into Asia as the historian of the expedition. At first he compared Alexander to a god, but later he became one of the principal critics of the Eastern manners of the court. He was suspected of complicity in a conspiracy against Alexander and put to death; this turned the Peripatetics, Aristotle's followers, against Alexander. Callisthenes' histories of contemporary affairs in Greece are lost. In medieval times he was believed to be the author of the standard biography of Alexander, a work that actually was written much later than Callisthenes' lifetime.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Schwartz, "Kallisthenes Hellenika," Hermes 35, 1900, 106-30; H.D.
Helen Morales, in her book-length study Vision and Narrative in Achilles Tatius, gives an account of the different social types surrounding the lovers, picking out Thersandros, Konops and Kallisthenes in particular as negative 'embodiments of social and moral values and as representatives of different ways of viewing the world,' who 'to a certain extent ...
Three other instances in which the author/narrator probes the line between acceptable and unacceptable behaviour deserve brief mention: the separate cases of Chaereas and Charmides, who both start out in friendly relation to Kleitophon, but later break all the rules of group behaviour through their inappropriate approaches to Leukippe; and the case of Kallisthenes, who enters the story as an immoderate rascal, but eventually (by way of a slightly botched though ultimately successful abduction) reappears as a responsible statesman and desirable brother-in-law for Kleitophon.
Kallisthenes offers a particularly interesting case study of the boundaries between villain and Mensch.
(53) One might also note the partial resemblance of Kallisthenes' role to those of Hippothoos in Xenophon of Ephesos and Thyamis in Heliodoros, both of them enemy brigands who later become friends of the hero and abandon their earlier antisocial careers to reenter civil society.