mountain laurel

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Related to Kalmia latifolia: Kalmia angustifolia

mountain laurel,

evergreen shrub (Kalmia latifolia) of the family Ericaceae (heathheath,
in botany, common name for some members of the Ericaceae, a family of chiefly evergreen shrubs with berry or capsule fruits. Plants of the heath family form the characteristic vegetation of many regions with acid soils, particularly the moors, swamps, and mountain slopes
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 family), closely related to the rhododendron and native to E North America. The state flower of Connecticut and Pennsylvania, it has leathery leaves and large clusters of spring-blooming pink or white flowers borne at the ends of the branches. The flowers are unusual in having the anthers of the stamens held in little pockets of the corolla and released like springs when touched by an insect. Mountain laurel, called also calico bush and spoonwood, is poisonous to livestock but seldom palatable; formerly its leaves were used as a remedy for skin diseases, and spoons were made from the hard wood. Like other species of Kalmia (named for Peter Kalm) that share its poisonous quality and elastic stamens, it is an acid-soil plant. The sheep laurel or lambkill (K. angustifolia) has smaller, deeper pink flowers not borne at the branch tips. The true laurellaurel,
common name for the Lauraceae, a family of forest trees and shrubs found mainly in tropical SE Asia but also abundant in tropical America. Most have aromatic bark and foliage and are evergreen; deciduous species are usually those that extend into temperate zones.
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 belongs to a separate family. Although the leaves of Kalmia somewhat resemble in shape those of the true laurel, only the latter (sold as bayleaf) is suitable for seasoning. Mountain laurel is classified in the division MagnoliophytaMagnoliophyta
, division of the plant kingdom consisting of those organisms commonly called the flowering plants, or angiosperms. The angiosperms have leaves, stems, and roots, and vascular, or conducting, tissue (xylem and phloem).
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, class Magnoliopsida, order Ericales, family Ericaceae.

mountain laurel

traditional symbol of ambition. [Flower Symbolism: Flora Symbolica, 175]

mountain laurel

of Connecticut and Pennsylvania. [Flower Symbolism: Golenpaul, 628]
References in periodicals archive ?
Kalmia latifolia was widespread and tall, averaging 80% cover and 2 m in height, respectively.
The final cohort formed between 1925 and 1990 and consisted of miscellaneous hardwoods, especially Acer rubrum and Nyssa sylvatica, and the shrub Kalmia latifolia. Of these three species, the two tree species generally established during the 1950s and 1960s while Kalmia latifolia continued to establish throughout the entire period.
Kalmia latifolia produces flowers clustered in corymbs, and one plant can have thousands of flowers open at one time (with an average of 20 flowers distributed on each of [greater than]500 inflorescences; M.
Kalmia latifolia at the Virginia sites are infected with Cercospora kalmiae, which thrives in moist and shady conditions.
A KALMIA Latifolia (Calico bush) is a native of North America and has to be grown in acid soil.
Although Kalmia latifolia is traditionally considered an outcrossing species, the frequency of delayed autonomous self-pollination ("selfing") has been shown to vary among populations.
For the Virginia population of Kalmia latifolia, competition for pollinators with the simultaneously flowering shrub Vaccinium erythrocarpum (Ericaceae) may limit pollinator visitation (Real and Rathcke, 1991; Rathcke and Real, 1993).
Commercially feasible micropropagation of montain laurel, Kalmia latifolia, by use of shoot tip culture.
- Before conversion to grass in 1958, Kalmia latifolia, Rhododendron maximum, and Quercus prinus were the three most abundant woody species in WS6; when combined, they occupied 53.0% of the IV and 31.3% of the basal area (Table 1).
The base of cliffs support dense thickets of mountain laurel (Kalmia latifolia) and rhododendron (Rhododendron spp.), with chestnut oak the dominant overstory species.
In addition, the species importance values [ILLUSTRATION FOR FIGURE 5 OMITTED] indicate that some species, among them Gaylussacia, Kalmia angustifolia, Pteridium, Vaccinium pallidum and the scrub oak occur mostly on sandy sites, while Kalmia latifolia, Vaccinium angustifolium and white pine occur mostly on rocky sites.
Bases of cliffs harbored dense thickets of mountain laurel (Kalmia latifolia) and rhododendron (Rhododendron spp.), with chestnut oak (Q.