Kamiokande

Kamiokande

(kah-mee-oh-kahn -day) See neutrino astronomy.
Collins Dictionary of Astronomy © Market House Books Ltd, 2006
References in periodicals archive ?
Kajita is a physicist known for neutrino experiments on Kamiokande and its successor, Super-Kamiokande.
The Tokai to Kamiokande (T2K) experiment [57, 61] uses the Super-Kamiokande [62] as a far detector for the J-Park neutrino beam, which consists of an off-axis (by a 2.5[degrees] angle) predominantly muon neutrino flux with energy around 0.6 GeV.
IceCube is much more sensitive than the three relatively small observatories that detected SN 1987A: Kamiokande II near Hida, Japan; the Irvine-Michigan-Brookhaven detector at Lake Erie; and the Baksan Neutrino Observatory in the Russian Caucasus.
A unique feature of SN1987A was the detection of a neutrino burst when two neutrino observatories, Kamiokande II and IMB, detected 11 and 8 antineutrinos respectively and this event arguably led to the beginning of neutrino astronomy.
His image of the neutrino observatory in a deep mine below Kamioka-cho in Japan, Kamiokande, is quintessentially sublime (you can just about make out figures in a boat staring up at the thousands of photomultiplier tubes above them, like figures in a Caspar David Friedrich painting).
Topics include neutrino cross sections and scattering physics, neutrino mass measurements, the latest neutrino oscillation results from the Super- Kamiokande project, top quark physics, W and Z physics at Tevatron (the world's highest energy synchrotron), physics from polarized ep collisions, ultra high energy cosmic rays and the Auger Observatory, very high energy gamma ray astronomy, astroparticle physics with neutrinos, current and future searches for dark matter, rare B decays and B decay dynamics, charm physics, kaon physics, and the impact of jet measurements in ep collisions.
The team expects to complete an observatory measuring about 1 cubic kilometer by 2009-2010 that is about 20,000 times the capacity of the gigantic underground neutrino detector named Super Kamiokande in Hida, Gifu Prefecture.
Though other neutrino detectors, namely Super Kamiokande and SNO have shown neutrino oscillations, collaborators such as Robert Mckweon of CalTech say that KamLAND offers conclusive evidence and provides "a clear demonstration of neutrino oscillations."
In February 1987 the supernova SN1987A caused a large flux of neutrinos, some of which were detected by the original Kamiokande detector.
Japanese physicist Masatoshi Koshiba won the 2002 Nobel Prize for Physics for confirming the existence of neutrinos in nature by developing and using a device called the Kamiokande, which is located in a mine in Kamioka, Gifu Prefecture.