Kanchipuram

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Kanchipuram

Kanchipuram (kŭnˈchēpo͝orəm), formerly Conjeeveram, city (1991 pop. 171,129), Tamil Nadu state, S India. Sacred to Hindus, it is known as the “golden city” and the “Varanasi of the south.” Several temples in the Dravidian style survive from the period when it was the capital of the Pallava empire (3d–8th cent.) of S India and Sri Lanka and a center of Brahmanical and Buddhist culture. Still considered one of the important sacred Hindu cities, it has more than 100 Hindu temples. The city was captured (8th cent.) by the Chalukya dynasty and subsequently passed to the Chola (11th–13th cent.), to the Vijayanagar (early 15th cent.), and to the Odisha (late 15th cent.) kingdoms. After 1481 it fell to several different Muslim sultanates. A base of French power in India, it was captured by Robert Clive in 1758. Its ancient name was Kanchi.
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The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Kanchipuram

 

a city in southern India, on the Palar River, in Tamil Nadu State. Population, 110, 500 (1971). Kan-chipuram’s well-known cottage industries include the manufacturing of cotton and silk fabrics. Saris, the Indian national costumes for women, are made there. Kanchipuram is a Hindu religious center. It is one of the oldest cities in India. Among its numerous architectural monuments are the temples of Kailasanath (700–725), Vaikunthaperumal (begun in 725), and Ekam-bareshwara (begun in 1509). It is also the site of tombs.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

Kanchipuram

a city in SE India, in Tamil Nadu: a sacred Hindu town known as "the Benares of the South"; textile industries. Pop.: 152 984 (2001)
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
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