Kano Motonobu

The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Kano Motonobu

 

Born 1476; died 1559. Japanese painter, who with his father, Kano Masanobu, founded the Kano school of painting.

Kano Motonobu painted landscapes, flowers, birds, and scenes from Buddhist legends on screens, sliding partitions, and scrolls. He expanded the decorative techniques of monochromatic ink-painting and used the traditions of the yamato-e school. Most of Motonobu’s works are preserved in monasteries in or near Kyoto (Daitokuji, Reiun-in, and Koya-san).

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
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It is nevertheless easy to see in the paintings of Kano Motonobu (1476-1559) and his descendants that the clan counted many highly talented artists among its ranks, held together in a tight corporate organization of training and division of labor that flourished in the social stability imposed by the nation's military rulers.
Painted from memory after a winter trip to Ogunquit in 1907, the lucid and fluid palette pleased Freer very much, and he even compared it to works by the great masters from the Japanese Kano school (established by Kano Motonobu c.1513) as well as to Song Dynasty (960-1279) ink landscape paintings.
--in "The Flight of the Sixth Patriarch" by Kano Motonobu