Kansas City


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Kansas City,

two adjacent cities of the same name, one (1990 pop. 149,767), seat of Wyandotte co., NE Kansas (inc. 1859), the other (1990 pop. 435,146), Clay, Jackson, and Platte counties, NW Mo. (inc. 1850). They are at the junction of the Missouri and Kansas (or Kaw) rivers and together form a large commercial, industrial, and cultural center. They are a port of entry, the focus of many transportation lines, with markets for wheat, hay, poultry, and seed. Both cities have meat, dairy, and agricultural processing and packaging plants. Among the chief manufactures of the metropolitan area are auto bodies, chemicals, petroleum and paper products, machinery, and transportation equipment. There are also printing and publishing companies. During the 1970s and 80s the outlying towns and cities that comprise Kansas City's suburban area developed their own industries, businesses, and corporate bases for various companies. As a result, the population of the two adjacent cities declined, and nearby suburban communities and housing developments grew. In the 21st cent., however, the downtown of Kansas City, Mo., has seen a significant revival.

The area was the starting point of many Western expeditions; the Santa Fe and Oregon trails passed through there. Several historic settlements of the early 19th cent. (including Westport) have become full-fledged cities. Kansas City, Kans., is the seat of two theological seminaries, the Univ. of Kansas Medical Center, and a state school for the blind (est. 1868). It has an agricultural hall of fame and several museums, and the Huron Indian cemetery is of interest. Kansas City, Mo., is the site of the Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art, the Kemper Museum of Contemporary Art and Design, and the National World War I Museum as well as a science museum and other attractions in the renovated Union Station. There are numerous parks and public spaces filled with fountains and sculptures. Country Club Plaza (finished 1922) was one of the first U.S. shopping malls. Among its educational institutions are the Univ. of Missouri–Kansas City, Avila College, Park College, Rockhurst College, Kansas City Art Institute, a college of osteopathy and surgery, a music conservatory, and theological schools. The city has a symphony orchestra; among its theaters are those of the Kauffman Center for the Performing Arts. The Kansas City Star was founded (1880) by William Rockhill Nelson and headed by him until 1915. The Kansas City Royals (baseball) and the Kansas City Chiefs (football) are the major sports teams, and the Kansas Speedway and the Negro Leagues Baseball Museum are located here. Kansas City has long been noted for its music, particularly jazz and swing, popular there since the 1930s. Kansas City holds various jazz and blues festivals and is home to a jazz museum.

Bibliography

See W. D. Grant, The Romantic Past of the Kansas City Region (1987).

Kansas City

 

a city in the central part of the USA, in the state of Missouri. Located on the Missouri River where the Kansas River flows into it. Population, 507,000 (1970). The city and Kansas City, Kansas (population, 168,000), on the opposite bank of the Kansas River, form a single urban agglomeration with a population of 1.3 million (1970). It is a major commercial and transportation hub, located in the center of an important agricultural region (meat-cattle breeding, wheat, corn). The work force numbers 511,000 (1969), of whom 26 percent are in industry, 40 percent in commerce and services, and 6.5 percent in finance. The canned-meat, flour-grinding, and metalworking industries are the most important. Steel smelting, production of agricultural and road-building machinery, motor-vehicle assembly, and oil refining are carried on there. Kansas City has chemical, soap, wood-products, printing, and radio-electronics industries, as well as agricultural elevators and stockyards. A university is located there. The city was founded in the 19th century.

Kansas City

1. a city in W Missouri, at the confluence of the Missouri and Kansas Rivers: important centre of livestock and meat-packing industry. Pop.: 442 768 (2003 est.)
2. a city in NE Kansas, adjacent to Kansas City, Missouri. Pop.: 145 757 (2003 est.)
References in periodicals archive ?
Once opened, the Kansas City office provided John Deere with a gateway to expanding new markets in the west.
and Kansas City battled for the AFC West title all year.
CVS Health said it selected Kansas City for the location of the new distribution center because of Missouri's high-quality workforce and centralized geography.
Rob Bratcher will be promoted to President of Commerce Bank of Kansas City and will lead the commercial banking division in Kansas City.
Music lovers know Kansas City as the home of "swing", where Count Basie started his new form of jazz in the local Kansas City clubs, and where Fats Domino was inspired to write his classic hit, "Kansas City, Here I Come."
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The Kansas City Lightning line of gas engines was produced by Kansas City Hay Press Co., Kansas City, Mo., beginning in about 1900.
The 71-acre facility, near Kansas City International Airport and Interstate 29, will support the service and fulfillment needs of more than 370 CVS Pharmacy stores across the Midwest
Kansas City Life Insurance Company was established in 1895 and is based in Kansas City, Missouri.
Sporting won their fifth straight home match in Kansas City last weekend, defeating defending champions Portland 1-0, and the 12-5 available for a repeat result looks great value.
KANSAS CITY, Mo., Sha'ban 03, 1437, May 10, 2016, SPA -- A Kansas City, Kansas, police detective helping respond to a report of a suspicious person near a racetrack was fatally shot Monday, and a parolee sought for questioning in that and an ensuing string of reported carjackings was wounded after a shootout with police in neighboring Missouri, according to AP.

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