Kansas-Nebraska Act of 1854


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Kansas-Nebraska Act of 1854

 

an act that granted tothe white population of Kansas and Nebraska (new territoriesincorporated into the USA) the right to decide the question ofallowing or forbidding slavery on their territory. Adopted by theUS Congress, it in effect abolished the prearranged border between the free and slaveholding states (36°30’ N lat.) establishedby the Missouri Compromise of 1820. In the actual historicalsituation of the middle of the 19th century this solution met thedemands of the slaveholders alone, who were striving to spreadslavery throughout the entire USA. Its adoption provoked anarmed struggle in Kansas between the advocates and opponentsof slavery (1854–56).

References in periodicals archive ?
Douglas had written the Kansas-Nebraska Act of 1854, which allowed the inhabitants of new states to decide whether slavery should be legal in them.
(34) This analysis skips from the Wilmot Proviso of 1846-47 to the Kansas-Nebraska Act of 1854, omitting any mention of the territorial laws passed as part of the great Compromise of 1850.
His doubts flared with the passage of the Kansas-Nebraska Act of 1854, which created the prospect of the introduction of slavery to those two territories, and the 1856 election to the presidency of James Buchanan, who was sympathetic to slavery's extension.
The Turners and other radical 1848ers are followed as they made the transition from radical democrats in a European context, to Radical Republicans in an American one in the aftermath of the Kansas-Nebraska act of 1854. Levine explores the ways in which German-American radical democrats shared in the national experience of mobilizing over the slavery issue, and the ways in which their reactions were shaped by their German experience.
The last straw was the Kansas-Nebraska Act of 1854, which brought the two territories into the Union.