Kao Shih

Kao Shih

 

(pseudonym of Kao Tafu). Born 700?; died in January 765, in Ch’ang-an. Chinese poet.

Kao Shih spent his youth wandering about the country; he later became a hermit. In his old age he passed the examination to receive a scholarly degree and entered government service. Kao Shih wrote about the sufferings of the people. Many of his works deal with military themes. He was closely linked with such leading figures of T’ang poetry as Tu Fu and Li Po. His best verses (“Yen Metody,” “Song About Yingchou,” and “Parting With a Friend at Night”) are very popular in China.

WORKS

In Russian translation:
In Antologiia kitaiskoi poezii, vol. 2. Moscow, 1957.
Mentioned in ?
References in classic literature ?
I liked the things and the kisses, but it was dreadful to have you sit looking at me while I opened the bundles," said Beth, who was toasting her face and the bread for tea at the same time.
He did not seem to know what to bless, but he looked as though he would have liked to include most of the universe.
She was a restless, headstrong girl, even then, who liked to astonish her friends.
She began to do as she liked and to feel as she liked.
So I didn't say anything, and soon liked him very well indeed.
Weston did think of it, she was very strongly persuaded; and though not meaning to be induced by him, or by any body else, to give up a situation which she believed more replete with good than any she could change it for, she had a great curiosity to see him, a decided intention of finding him pleasant, of being liked by him to a certain degree, and a sort of pleasure in the idea of their being coupled in their friends' imaginations.
She liked the name, and she liked still more the feeling that when its beautiful old walls shut her in no one knew where she was.
Next, he took me forcibly by the hand, and, tapping my cheek, said that I was very good-looking, and that he greatly liked the dimples in my face (God only knows what he meant
Bingley was sure of being liked wherever he appeared, Darcy was continually giving offense.
Captain Wentworth was come to Kellynch as to a home, to stay as long as he liked, being as thoroughly the object of the Admiral's fraternal kindness as of his wife's.
Factious followers are worse to be liked, which follow not upon affection to him, with whom they range themselves, but upon discontentment conceived against some other; whereupon commonly ensueth that ill intelligence, that we many times see between great personages.
The king liked the advice, and had the spinning-wheels placed in the ante-chamber.