Karasuk Culture


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Karasuk Culture

 

an archaeological culture of the late Bronze Age (end of the second millennium to the beginning of the first millennium B.C.), widespread mainly in the mountains of southern Siberia, in Kazakhstan, and along the upper Ob’. The culture is represented by the remains of settlements and burial mounds (more than 100 graves in each). The burials are in stone chests under a low mound with small quadrangular enclosures made of small upright stone slabs. The tribes of the Karasuk culture engaged in stock raising. They also extracted copper ore (bronze articles were decorated with geometric designs and sculptured representations of animals), made clay vessels and woolen fabrics, and had a knowledge of farming. The tribes were associated with the ancient populations of northern China, Mongolia, the Cisbaikal and Transbaikal regions, western Siberia, and Middle Asia.

REFERENCES

Kiselev, S. V. Drevniaia istoriia Iuzhnoi Sibiri, 2nd ed. Moscow, 1951.
Istoriia Sibiri s drevneishikh vremen do nashikh dnei, vol. 1. Leningrad, 1968.
Novgorodova, E. A. Tsentral’naia Aziia i Karasukskaia problema. Moscow, 1970.
References in periodicals archive ?
The analyze the role of the horse in gender identity, as in the case of women's attire in northern Kazakhstan, eating habits on the eastern edges of the Eurasian steppe and the society of Korea, and comment on how women and children figured in Sargat culture, how men and women sorted themselves out in Karasuk culture, and how luxury and power divided the sexes in eastern Eurasia.