Lueger, Karl

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Lueger, Karl

(kärl lü`gər), 1844–1910, Austrian politician. He was the leader of the Christian Social party. Lueger appealed to the lower middle classes of Vienna through his anti-Semitism, which was partly religious but mostly opportunist. He was elected mayor of Vienna in 1897, despite the initial opposition of Emperor Francis Joseph, and he held that post until his death. During his administration the public utilities and municipal parks of Vienna were expanded and improved. Lueger was primarily concerned with increasing the church's influence and getting votes. His views and tactics may have influenced the young Adolf Hitler, who then lived in Vienna.
References in periodicals archive ?
A long campaign ensued till Hilsner's liberation, and, in the process, Masaryk won over many Czechs to his view that anti-semitism was a pernicious pack of lies at a time when it was almost Catholic doctrine ( Viennas's mayor Karl Lueger kept been re-elected till his death in 1910 on an explicitly anti-semitic platform, strongly backed by the Church).
Home to great minds like Sigmund Freud, Stefan Zweig and Gustav Mahler, Vienna in 1897 voted in the openly anti-Semitic mayor Karl Lueger who would stay in power for 13 years.
Por poner solo un ejemplo, tal es el caso de Viena, donde hasta abril de 2012 una de las plazas que conformaba la famosa Ringstrasse--la calle circular que bordea el centro historico de la capital austriaca--llevaba el nombre de Karl Lueger, alcalde de esta ciudad entre 1897 y 1910.
All the same, racial attacks from Wagner and escalating Viennese anti-Semitism after 1897, when the Christian Social mayor Karl Lueger took office, likely made it impossible for Hanslick to ignore his Jewish heritage.
With the appointment of the anti-Semitic Karl Lueger as mayor in 1897, they began to feel, in Kokoschka's words, 'less secure than the rest of the Viennese Establishment'.
Karl Lueger (1844-1910), who was protector of the common man, a proponent of social justice, and the mayor of Vienna from 1897 to 1910.
The picture that emerges is comprehensive, but alas, uncritical: Eddy does not enter into detailed discussions of topics that have engaged other critics--like the tension between pornography and social commentary in Josephine Mutzenbacher, or the apparent contradiction between Salten's Zionism and his deep understanding for the populist anti-Semitism of Karl Lueger and the "scientific" racial essentialism of Houston Stewart Chamberlain.
Chancellor Ignaz Seipel's Christian Social Party was founded by the prominent antisemite Karl Lueger and its program bore a close resemblance to that of the National Socialists, but Seipel was alarmed at the socialist elements within National Socialism and appalled at the movement's rejection of Christianity.
Georg von Schonerer (1842-1921), "extrana mezcla de ganster, filisteo y aristocrata, que se consideraba a si mismo el caballero redentor del Volk aleman", provenia de la vieja izquierda a la que trasformo en una nueva ideologia de derecha: agrupo a los radicales alemanes y los condujo hacia una politica antisemita extrema, un pangermanismo racista; aunque Karl Lueger (1844-1910) compartiera con Schonerer ciertas metodologias (la apelacion a los estudiantes y artesanos, el uso del alboroto y la turba como tecnica politica), estas fueron utilizadas para desarrollar el movimiento contrario: Lueger transformo el catolicismo politico austriaco (una vieja y tradicional politica de derecha) en una nueva ideologia de izquierda, el socialismo cristiano.
But fin-de-siecle Austria and Germany also included Wilhelm Marr, the German Reichstag deputy who coined the term antisemitism, Georg von Schoenerer, the Austrian antisemitic leader of the Pan-German movement, and the charismatic Karl Lueger, the mayor of Vienna, who attained office on the platform of his antisemitic party, and whose political demagoguery made a lasting impression on the young Adolf Hitler, who arrived in the imperial capital of the Austrio-Hungarian Empire in 1907, the same year as that of Lueger's election victory.
Zweig barely mentions the rampant antisemitism in turn-of-the-century Vienna under the openly racist mayor Karl Lueger.
In 1898, after the Christian Democratic (Catholic) leader Karl Lueger was elected mayor on a blatantly anti-Jewish platform, Vienna became perhaps the most anti-Semitic city in the world.