Lepsius, Karl Richard

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Lepsius, Karl Richard

(rĭkh`ärt lĕp`sēo͝os), 1810–84, German Egyptologist and philologist. He made an expedition (1842–45) to the Nile valley and Sudan and as a result of his excavations and studies wrote Denkmäler aus Ägypten und Äthiopien [monuments from Egypt and Ethiopia] (12 vol., 1849–59), which remains an important archaeological work.
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References in periodicals archive ?
(12) In the novel, Hopkins recuperates the work of early German Egyptologist Karl Richard Lepsius. While Lepsius is acknowledged as one of the founders of Egyptology (his work is still used in contemporary archeology), his more controversial findings have only recently been widely publicized.
In 1842, German archaeologist Karl Richard Lepsius mentioned it among his finds at Saqqara, giving it number 29 and calling it the 'Headless Pyramid' because its top was missing.
Although the buried cities of Pompeii and Herculaneum had been excavated over a century earlier, the nineteenth century witnessed a succession of important archaeological events, which appeared to lend historical credibility to what previously were thought to be myths or fictions: Karl Richard Lepsius's excavations at Meroe, Heinrich Schliemann's discovery of Troy, Sir Arthur Evans's finds at Knossos, and Karl Gottlieb Mauch's purported locating of King Solomon's Mines in Zimbabwe.