Potidaea

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Potidaea

Potidaea (pŏtĭdēˈə), ancient city, NE Greece, at the narrowest point of the Pallene (now Kassándra) peninsula in Chalcidice (now Khalkidhikí). It was a Corinthian colony (c.600 B.C.) but joined the Athenian-dominated Delian League. Potidaea revolted (432) against Athens with Corinthian help, providing one of the incitements to the Peloponnesian War. Athens recaptured (430 or 429) the city. Philip II of Macedon took (356) Potidaea and may have destroyed it in the ensuing war. Rebuilt by Cassander, the city was named Cassandreia.
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Potidaea

 

(Poteidaia or Potidaia), an ancient Greek city on the Pallini (Kassandra) Peninsula of Chalcidice. Founded circa 600 B.C. by the Corinthians, Potidaea became a member of the Delian League. However, because of an increase in the phoros (the annual levy required from league members) and interference by Athens in the city’s domestic affairs, Potidaea seceded from the league in 432 B.C. This action was one of the causes of the Peloponnesian War of 431–404 B.C.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.