Kashubs

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Kashubs

 

(self-designation, Kashebi), descendants of the ancient Pomors who live on the shores of the Baltic Sea in the northeastern regions of Poland. They speak the Kashubian dialect of Polish. In the early 14th century the lands of the Kashubs were seized by the Knights of the Teutonic Order. Eastern Pomor’e was reunited with Poland by the Treaty of Torun in 1466. Prussia gained control of the Kashubian lands in the first and second partitions of Poland (1772, 1793). They were returned to Poland by the Treaty of Versailles in 1919. The Kashubs have preserved their own culture despite long forced Germanization.

REFERENCES

Lavrovskii, P. “Etnograficheskii ocherk kashubov.” Filologicheskie zapiski, Voronezh, 1873, issues 4–5.
Bukowski, A. Regionalizm kaszubski, Poznan, 1950.
References in periodicals archive ?
It was a cross between the typical Kashubian cottage and something like a workshop and a storehouse: as much a fishmonger's as a boatyard.
So this particular demon couldn't possibly have come from a decent Kashubian family of devils, homegrown and controllable.
From this perspective, the novel can be briefly summarized as a process of Castorp's maturing through his discovery of his own identity as a member of a nation that exercises authority over the population of Poles and Kashubians, both of whom are viewed as inferior.
In the novel the knowledge of the subjugated ethnic groups, such as Poles and Kashubians, is an element of the discourse of power.
Viewed by Castorp the biker, the indigenous Polish and Kashubian people constitute an enclave driven to the margin of the world and its spatial representation.
The first instance of transgression occurs when Castorp meets a poor Kashubian boy.
All I can remember of it is that after a brief outline of the economic conditions in the Kashubian hinterland I started in on pillages and massacres with a vengeance.
My mother's favorite cousin, like her a Kashubian by birth, worked at the Polish post office of the Free City of Danzig.
This new journal accepts articles in Kashubian, Polish, German, Russian, and English.
A paper by Jorn Achtenberg and Marlena Porebska, "Research into the Vitality of Kashubian Language: An Empirical Study in Glodnica," deals with the chances of survival of the Kashubian language.
In the reviews section, Wojciech Osinski writes about Pawe" Huelle's novel Mercedes-Benz, Wiktor Pepliiski's study of Kashubian periodicals titled Czasopismiennictwo kaszubskie w latach zaboru pruskiego, and a collective publication dedicated to Boleslaw Fac, a recently-deceased translator and author (Boleslaw Fac.