Kaskaskia

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Related to Kaskaskia Indians: Kaskaskia River

Kaskaskia

(kăskăs`kēə), small village, Randolph co., SE Ill., on Kaskaskia island in the Mississippi River where it is joined by the Kaskaskia River. The settlement was established (1703) by Jesuit missionaries and named for a local Native American group of the Illinois. The French built a fort there in 1721, which was destroyed when Kaskaskia was taken over (1763) by the British. During the American Revolution, George Rogers Clark took (1778) U.S. possession of the village. It thrived as the capital of Illinois Territory (1809–18) and state capital (1818–20); the first Illinois newspaper started there in 1814. The community declined after the capital was shifted (1820) to Vandalia; flooding from the Mississippi in the late 19th cent. further discouraged growth. Fort Kaskaskia State Park was set aside in 1927 across the Mississippi River near Chester, Ill.
References in periodicals archive ?
Thomas Jefferson and the Eighth Congress's funding of the Catholic Church to help assimilate the Kaskaskia Indians follows the same criterion present in the current Faith-Based & Community Initiative: funding "should go to the providers who can provide the most effective assistance and who can boast the best civic outcomes." (215) In other words, good old American value--the best service for the lowest price should prevail.
(223) Given Jefferson's dedication to federalism and his "Faith-Based Initiative" with the Kaskaskia Indians as discussed in Part II above, Jefferson would agree with Justice Rehnquist's assessment.
Given the history of President Jefferson, the Eighth Congress, and the Treaty with the Kaskaskia Indians, it is time for the Court to reconsider the meaning of the Establishment Clause.