Kavaja

(redirected from Kavaje)
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Kavaja

 

a city in Albania, near Durrës, the country’s main port on the Adriatic Sea. Population, about 20,000 (1969). The city has metalworking, glass-making, and food-processing enterprises.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
His first came in a 6-1 win over Sporting Lisbon of Portugal and the second was in a 7-1 victory against Albanian side Besa Kavaje.
Spells with FK Shkendija in his native Macedonia, KS Besa Kavaje in Albania and finally FK Qarabaq in Azerbaijan followed before akiri finally retired from playing in 2009, aged 36.
Meanwhile, there are built in record time 9 wastewater treatment plants like in Kavaje, Pogradec, Korce, Durres, Sarande-Ksamil, Shengjin-Lezhe, Shiroke, Velipoje, Vlore and work is underway in Tirana, Kavaja resort with Golem included, Shkodra etc.PM Berisha appreciated the Sewerage Treatment Plant a major investment and said that this time next year Orikum will have the most modern water infrastructure."This investment, -said the prime minister, - transforms Orikum into a developed town and puts it on the map of the cleanest cities of Europe.
In the month of July 1941 we were deported to Albania and interned in the concentration camp of Kavaje. At the end of 1941 we were transferred to concentration camp of Ferramonti di Tarsia (Cosenza Province) in south Italy, where we remained until the end of 1942.
That is why, after some 30 years, we continue to wrestle with such problems as defining learning disabilities (cf., Coles, 1987; Kavale & Forness, 1995; Klatt, 1991; Shaw, Cullen, McGuire, & Brinckerhoff, 1995; Swanson, 1991), explaining the overrepresentation of minority students in special education (cf., Artiles & Trent, 1994), and perhaps most importantly, whether special education works at all (cf., Fuchs & Fuchs, 1995b; Kavaje, 1990; Zigmond et al., 1995).
In a series of impassioned demonstrations in Albania's major cities-Tirana, Shkoder, Durres, Kavaje and Elbasan-urban residents gained a sense of their strength in numbers.