Kashgar

(redirected from Kaxgar)

Kashi

, Kashgar
an oasis city in W China, in W Xinjiang Uygur AR. Pop.: 318 000 (2005 est.)

Kashgar

 

a city in western China, in the Sinkiang-Uighur Autonomous Region, located on the Kashgar River in the center of a large oasis in the southern foothills of the Tien-Shan. Population, 90, 800 (1953). The city consists of two parts—Shifu and Shule. Kashgar was a transport center on an ancient trade route. It is now an important economic center, with agricultural machine-building and textile, flour-milling, and ceramics enterprises. The handicrafts industry is also well developed. A hydroelectric power plant is located in the city.


Kashgar

 

(Kyzylsu), a river in western China and in the USSR, with its upper course in the Tadzhik and Kirghiz Soviet Socialist Republics. The Kashgar is 765 km long (including 685 km in China) and drains an area (together with the Gezdar’ia River) of 90,800 sq km. It rises in the slopes of the Alai and Trans-Alai ranges and has a mountain character in its upper course. The lower Kashgar flows through the Kashgar Plain, watering a large oasis of over 2,500 sq km. The average discharge in the lower course is 77 cu m per sec, with a maximum of approximately 500 cu m per sec. There are summer floods with considerable sediment discharge. The Kashgar previously flowed into the Yarkand but now is lost in the sands of Tograkkum. Thecity of Kashgar is located on it.

References in periodicals archive ?
Drawing on fieldwork conducted in 2011-2012 and interviews with stakeholders and residents of different ethnicities and income levels, the book describes urban planning and modernization in the region and discusses the impact of construction, demolition, and reconstruction of public spaces, architectural landmarks, and residences in two cities: Aksu and Kaxgar. Some specific topics include the political economy of urban developments in Xinjiang, performing ethnic identities in urban public spaces in Aksu, food spaces and night markets, and relocation and the loss of social capital.
Born in 1644, he was the son of the chieftain of the Western Mongols (Kalmuks or Dzungars) Eleventh tribe; aspired to re-create the Mongol empire in Central Asia; conquered Kashgar (Kaxgar) and later all of Turkestan (1679); became khan of the Dzungars, or Western Mongols; invaded Outer Mongolia and routed the Eastern Mongols (1687); attempted to gain an alliance with the Russians but was frustrated by Chinese diplomacy; invaded Outer Mongolia again at the head of 30,000 men, but was defeated outside Ulan Bator (Ulaanbaatar) by a Chinese army of 80,000 under the personal command of Ch'iang Emperor K'ang-hsi; defeated again by Chinese troops led by the Emperor at Jao Modo in Turkestan (Urga, Uzbek S.S.R.) (1696), he committed suicide the following year (1697).
Born at Shemchurino in Pskov province (April 10, 1848); entered the army (1864); took part in the capture of Samarkand (1868); engaged in diplomatic work in Kashgaria (westernmost Xinjiang, near Kaxgar River) (1874); served in the conquest of Kokand (1876); during the Russo-Turkish War (April 1877-March 1878) he served as chief of staff for an infantry division under Gen.