Kazarma

The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Kazarma

 

(Barracks), an illegal Social Democratic newspaper published from Feb. 15, 1906, to March 1907; 13 issues of the newspaper were published, and its circulation was between 5, 000 and 20, 000 copies. It was printed in St. Petersburg, Moscow, and Finland. Mensheviks contributed to the first three issues, but the Bolsheviks determined its political line. Kazarma was the central publication of the provisional bureau of military and combat organizations of the Bolsheviks—in fact beginning with the first issue, and officially from November 1906. The editorial board of Kazarma included V. V. Vorovskii, M. S. Ol’minskii, V. R. Menzhinskii, V. D. Bonch-Bruevich, and Em. Iaroslavskii. Kazarma conducted revolutionary agitation and propaganda among the troops. Its publication was discontinued when the police smashed the military organizations of the RSDLP. In 1931 the Leningrad Institute of the History of the ACP (Bolshevik) reissued Kazarma as a book.

REFERENCE

Mishuris, A. L. “BoPshevistskaia voennaia gazeta ‘Kazarma.’ “In Bol -shevistskaia pechaf v dooktiabrskiiperiod: Sb. statei. Moscow, 1959.
The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Zaitsy are hares, not rabbits; magistral' is translated, strangely, as magistrate, when it should be highway; trassa is translated as worksite, when it should be path, course or road; Put' v kazarmu, as 'The Road to Caserma', where kazarma should be correctly translated as barracks; and kontslager' is a concentration camp, not a mere prison.