Kaziranga

(redirected from Kaziranga National Park)
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The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Kaziranga

 

a national park in India, in Assam State. The park was founded in 1908 to prevent the extermination of the rhinoceros. The area was 52, 000 hectares in 1970. On the boggy left bank of the Brahmaputra River there is high grass and sparse tree and shrub vegetation. In 1966 there were about 400 rhinoceroses, 375 wild elephants, 550 buffalo, 20 gaurs, 250 marsh deer, 300 sambars, more than 4, 000 hog deer, 100 muntjacs, 30 bears, 20 tigers, and 12 leopards in Kaziranga. Elephants are used for trips in the park, which until 1968 was a preserve.

REFERENCE

Gee, E. Dikie zhivotnye Indii. Moscow, 1968. (Translated from English.)
The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Overall, the state has five national parks including two UNESCO World Heritage sites called the Kaziranga National Park and Manas Wildlife Sanctuary, inhabited by a number of endangered species such as the Bengal tiger, Ganges river dolphin and the white-winged wood duck.
Summary: Morigaon (Assam) [India], Aug 1 (ANI): The water level at flood-hit Pobitora Wildlife Sanctuary and Kaziranga National Park has started receding with the sustained efforts of the forest department to provide relief to the animals residing there.
One-horned rhinos rest on a highland in the flood affected area of Kaziranga National Park in Nagaon district, in the northeastern state of Assam, India, July 18, 2019.
Most of the Kaziranga National Park, home to the rare one-horned rhino, was underwater, authorities in Assam said, adding that four people drowned on Monday.
Assam's Kaziranga National Park, home to the endangered one-horn rhinoceros, has been flooded.
Kaziranga National Park is home to endangered one-horned rhinoceros.
Elsewhere in Assam, Kaziranga National Park, home to the endangered one-horn rhinoceros, has been flooded.
The monsoon may bring respite from the scorching heat, but for the rangers and animals at Kaziranga National Park it also brings danger as poachers take advantage of greater camouflage and flooding.
They arrange unforgettable experiences such as the spring festival of Ali Aye Ligang with the local Mishing community, forest bathing, river safaris along the mighty Brahmaputra and visits to Assam silk weavers as well as astonishing game drives at the famed Kaziranga National Park, home of the Great Indian One Horned Rhino.
On their itinerary was avisit to the Kaziranga National Park, which homes tigers and elephants, where they enjoyed a Jeep safari and a traditional festival.
The Kaziranga National Park that they were visiting at the time was gravely affected.