keeper

(redirected from Keepers)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Idioms, Wikipedia.

keeper

Physics a soft iron or steel bar placed across the poles of a permanent magnet to close the magnetic circuit when it is not in use
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

keeper

[′kēp·ər]
(electromagnetism)
A bar of iron or steel placed across the poles of a permanent magnet to complete the magnetic circuit when the magnet is not in use, to avoid the self-demagnetizing effect of leakage lines. Also known as magnet keeper.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

strike plate, strike, striking plate

A metal plate or box which is set in a doorjamb and is either pierced or recessed to receive the bolt or latch of a lock, fixed on a door. Also see box strike plate.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in classic literature ?
The keeper stops and looks up, and then with a grin says, "Oh!
"Werry well; please yourself," says the keeper, descending, however, to the ground again, and taking his seat on the bank.
The keeper quietly proceeded to take out his pipe, fill, and light it, keeping an eye on Tom, who now sat disconsolately across the branch, looking at keeper--a pitiful sight for men and fishes.
The keeper spoke for a moment with an official, then opened the iron gates and conducted Andrea to a room on the first floor.
``Holy Clerk,'' said the knight, when his hunger was appeased, ``I would gage my good horse yonder against a zecchin, that that same honest keeper to whom we are obliged for the venison has left thee a stoup of wine, or a reinlet of canary, or some such trifle, by way of ally to this noble pasty.
In my judgment, you are fitter to keep a castle or a fort, eating of the fat and drinking of the strong, than to live here upon pulse and water, or even upon the charity of the keeper. At least, were I as thou, I should find myself both disport and plenty out of the king's deer.
During the delay that occurred while the keeper was opening the first cage, Don Quixote was considering whether it would not be well to do battle on foot, instead of on horseback, and finally resolved to fight on foot, fearing that Rocinante might take fright at the sight of the lions; he therefore sprang off his horse, flung his lance aside, braced his buckler on his arm, and drawing his sword, advanced slowly with marvellous intrepidity and resolute courage, to plant himself in front of the cart, commending himself with all his heart to God and to his lady Dulcinea.
Here the author's outburst came to an end, and he proceeded to take up the thread of his story, saying that the keeper, seeing that Don Quixote had taken up his position, and that it was impossible for him to avoid letting out the male without incurring the enmity of the fiery and daring knight, flung open the doors of the first cage, containing, as has been said, the lion, which was now seen to be of enormous size, and grim and hideous mien.
Seeing this, Don Quixote ordered the keeper to take a stick to him and provoke him to make him come out.
"But man, she is to be the stake of a game for slaves and criminals," cried the keeper. "You would not volunteer for such a game!"
"And you will chance incurring the wrath of O-Tar, who has no love for this savage barbarian," explained the keeper.
"It is a strange request," said the keeper, "but for my friend O-Zar I would do even more, though of course--" he hesitated--"it is customary for one who would be chief to make some slight payment."