Kekkonen


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Kekkonen

Urho . (1900--86), Finnish statesman; president (1956--81)
References in periodicals archive ?
Room 1 rightly earns its name as the Presidential Suite (this is where Kekkonen slept), and a grand piano in the warm, convivial lounge invites more than just a few Finnish G&Ts from the honesty bar.
But Jaison and Sharon finished with a total of 2,376 for the gold, while Kekkonen and Karhu came in second with 2,253 and Jan Barnard and Pat Nally representing British Airways and United Airlines came in third with 2,148.
In 1952, when he was Prime Minister, Kekkonen delivered a speech implicitly calling on Norway and Denmark to leave NATO, creating the "neutral" Scandinavian zone that had long been a major aim of Soviet foreign policy, the easier by which to Finlandize it.
Einst zahlten Urho Kekkonen, Kustaa Vikuna und Lauri Posti zu den Mitgliedern.
The most "visible" coaches were the presidents Paasikivi (1946-1956) and Kekkonen (1956-1981), who directed the Finnish media toward their own line of foreign policy publicly and also less publicly (Krosby 1978).
Part of Urho Kekkonen National Park in the north of Finland.
Finnish President Urho Kekkonen, who died in 1986, called sauna "the great leveler.
Suomalainen kommunismi ja sota (1937-1945), Helsinki: WSOY, 1994 and Niin kylmaa etta polttaa: Kommunistit, Kekkonen ja Kreml (1947-1958), Helsinki: Otava, 1997.
The Centre Party dominated Finnish politics during the Cold War because it was the party of Urho Kekkonen (1900-1986), who was president from 1956 to 1981.
Evidence of this attitude was present in 1948 when the speaker of the Finnish parliament, Urho Kekkonen (later, president of Finland), spoke out against Kilpinen's candidacy for the Academy of Arts and Sciences, citing the composer's ties to the Germany of the Third Reich.
On the other hand, there are also three conservation areas--the Hammastunturi and Tsarmitunturi wilderness areas and a small part of the Urho Kekkonen National Park--where reindeer herding is allowed.
Urho Kekkonen, President from 1956 until 1981, further developed this policy, stressing that Finland should be an active rather than a passive neutral.