Kellogg, Paul Underwood

Kellogg, Paul Underwood

(1879–1958) editor, social reformer; born in Kalamazoo, Mich. After working as a journalist, he went to New York City (1901) to study at Columbia University and then joined the editorial staff of Charities, a magazine devoted to philanthropic activities. In 1907 he left the magazine to commence an in-depth study of every aspect of life in Pittsburgh, the first such social survey of an American urban community; it was published as the Pittsburgh Survey (1910–14) and became a model for sociological investigation, stimulating national calls for housing, workmen's compensation, and other reforms. In 1909 he returned to his old magazine, now retitled Survey; as its editor (1912–52), he forged it into America's leading journal of social work and a major force in social reform, and during the 1930s he saw many of his concerns addressed by President Franklin Roosevelt's New Deal. In 1939 he was president of the National Conference of Social Work. In addition to advocating many social reforms that have since become widely accepted, he was active in a variety of progressive causes: he helped found the American Civil Liberties Union (1917) and the Foreign Policy Association (1918), he participated in the defense of Nicola Sacco and Bartolomeo Vanzetti, and he supported the Spanish republicans agains Franco.
The Cambridge Dictionary of American Biography, by John S. Bowman. Copyright © Cambridge University Press 1995. Reproduced with permission.