Keloid

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keloid

[′kē‚lȯid]
(medicine)
A firm, elevated fibrous formation of tissue at the site of a scar.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Keloid

 

a tumor-like growth of the fibrous connective tissue of the skin.

The causes of keloid development are not clear. Certain persons have a predisposition to their development. A distinction is made between true (spontaneous) keloids, which develop on visibly unchanged skin, and false keloids, which develop at the site of a scar after trauma (mechanical, thermal, chemical) or purulent disease (a furuncle, for example). A true keloid is a slightly elevated formation (5–8 mm above the skin surface) of whitish or pinkish color and dense consistency, with a smooth, shiny surface. Keloids appear most often in young people in the area of the chest, neck, and pinnae; and more rarely, on the face and limbs. Growth takes place for several weeks or sometimes months, after which the dimensions of the keloid remain unchanged throughout the patient’s lifetime. Treatment consists of injections of hyaluronidase and vitreous body; administration of vitamins PP, B2, and C; electrophoresis of potassium iodide; paraffin therapy; and X-ray therapy.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
A 32-year-old soldier reported a 5-year history of a euchromic nodule (4 cm x 3.5 cm) resembling a keloid scar with a smooth and shiny surface and progressive growth on the right arm (Figure 5, panel A).
Hand examination showed severe left ring finger proximal interphalangeal (PIP) joint contracture of 80[degrees], with palmar fibromatosis and keloid scar formation (Figures 1 and 2).
Comparison of a silicone gel-filled cushion and silicon gel sheeting for the treatment of hypertrophic or keloid scars. Dermatol Surg 1999;25(6):484-6.
Value of interstitial irradiation of keloid scars by Iridium 192.
Ekhlasi, "Studying intense pulsed light method along with corticosteroid injection in treating keloid scars," Iranian Red Crescent Medical Journal, vol.
Wal et al., "Intralesional cryotherapy for treatment of keloid scars: a prospective study," Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, vol.
Healthcare company Oculus Innovative Sciences (NasdaqCM:OCLS) announced on Tuesday that it has received a new CE Mark in Europe for Microcyn-based Epicyn Hydrogel for the reduction of new and existing hypertrophic and keloid scars.
[sup][6] In addition, silicone has been proposed as the main form of noninvasive treatment for hypertrophic and keloid scars and has demonstrated significant improvements in scar elasticity in patients prone to abnormal scarring.
7 GODZILLA'S appearance in the new film shows the monster covered in keloid scars - a feature taken from the original 1954 film.
TA could be the new therapeutical application for treating keloid scars. With the development of the advanced technologies, hundreds and thousands of treatments on keloid scar have been reported.
(2) Keloid scars have a firm and inflexible texture, a shiny appearance, and are elevated above skin level.