Kelvin body

Kelvin body

[′kel·vən ‚bäd·ē]
(mechanics)
An ideal body whose shearing (tangential) stress is the sum of a term proportional to its deformation and a term proportional to the rate of change of its deformation with time. Also known as Voigt body.
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References in periodicals archive ?
3-in thick kimberlite dike at a depth of 31 m was discovered about 200-in south of the Kelvin body in the same lake.
The Kelvin body is an appropriately constructed circuit of springs (to model elasticity) and dashpots (to model viscosity).
Encouraging thick kimberlite intersections were discovered both at and south of the Kelvin body and south of the Faraday body.
A hole drilled 120 m south of Kelvin-1a along the suspected structure between the Kelvin body and Hobbes-1 (a 2.
Kimberlite Intersections Location Kelvin-1a Kelvin body -- 9km NE of Kennady Kelvin-1b 50m West of Kelvin-1a drill hole Kelvin-2 120m South of Kelvin body Hobbes-1 300m South of Kelvin body Hobbes-2 70m South of Hobbes-1 Faraday-1a Faraday body -- 12km NE of Kennady Faraday-1b 100m SW of Faraday-1a Faraday-2 520m SW of Faraday-1a
It is suspected that this Hobbes intersection and the Kelvin body could be connected with a kimberlite bearing structure that pinches and swells.
18, 2002, news release and indicate that the micro diamond counts for the Kelvin body are very similar to those for the 5034 and Hearne pipes.
A ground gravity survey conducted in the current winter program covered the Kelvin body and as far as a few hundred meters south of Hobbes and identified several drill targets.
The micro-diamond counts from the Kelvin body are significant with counts very similar to those for the 5034 and Hearne pipes.
The result for the Kelvin body is also very similar to, if not slightly better, than the micro-diamond results for the Faraday body reported in July 1999 (and also shown in the table).
De Beers has decided to move their attention to the Faraday-Kelvin area this winter, because of the excellent micro-diamond results from the Kelvin body.
3 meter thick kimberlite dyke at a depth of 31 meters was discovered approximately 200 meters south of the Kelvin body in the same lake.