Kenkol Burial Ground

The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Kenkol Burial Ground

 

a group of barrows dating from the second to fourth centuries located on the Kenkol River, a right-bank tributary of the Talas River (Kirghiz SSR). The burial ground was left by local tribes of nomads. Discovered in 1938 by A. N. Bernshtam, it was excavated in 1938–39 and 1956–57. The burials were in subterranean vaulted chambers and in rectangular pits, sometimes in wooden coffins or on a wooden bed. Those interred were of the Europoid racial type with an admixture of Mongoloid features; the skulls were artificially deformed. The articles that were found included clay and wooden vessels, arrows with iron or bone arrowheads, bows with bone inlays, bronze mirrors, wooden tables, silk garments, and clay censers.

REFERENCES

Bernshtam, A. N. Kenkol’skii mogil’nik Leningrad, 1940.
Sorokin, S. S. “O datirovke i tolkovanii Kenkol’skogo mogil’nika.” In the collection Kratkie soobshcheniia o dokladakh i polevykh issledovaniiakh Instituta istorii material’noi kul’tury AN SSSR, 1956, no. 64.
Kozhomberdiev, I. “Katakombnye pamiatniki Talasskoi doliny.” In the collection Arkheologicheskie pamiatniki Talasskoi doliny. Fergana, 1963.
The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.