Kentucky Tragedy

Kentucky Tragedy

noted tale of retribution, inspired many works. [Am. Hist.: Benét, 544]
Allusions—Cultural, Literary, Biblical, and Historical: A Thematic Dictionary. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
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Murder and madness; the myth of the Kentucky tragedy.
A new history, The Kentucky Tragedy by Dickson Bruce (2006), tells the story of a particular murder--one of operatic proportion--that occurred during this tumultuous period.
Subsequent to the "Kentucky Tragedy," the American legal system invented an unwritten law that sometimes acquitted husbands who killed their wives' paramours, an invention that could not have occurred in the Beauchamp trial because the defendant denied his guilt.
Beauchamp killed Colonel Solomon Sharp in Frankfort, Kentucky, in 1825 for dishonoring his wife when she was younger, the incident, known as the Kentucky Tragedy, achieved international fame.
The significance of such links for understanding Southern ideas of honor becomes more fully apparent, however, in light of an episode in which the rhetorics of honor and sentiment came strongly together, the Kentucky Tragedy. One of the best-known and most complicated episodes from the antebellum period, it involved the murder of Colonel Solomon Sharp, one of Kentucky's most prominent politicians, by Jereboam Beauchamp, a young lawyer.
Among books published this year was World Enough and Time by Robert Penn Warren, a novel based on an 1825 murder case known as the Kentucky tragedy. Other books published this year included The Wall by John Hersey, a story of the last days of the Warsaw ghetto under Nazi attack during World War II; The Cardinal by Henry Morton Robinson, the story of the rise of a Catholic priest; and The Disenchanted by Budd Schulberg, a biting novel of the struggle for success in Hollywood.
MacMichael in The Kentucky Tragedy (1838) and Charles Fenno Hoffman in the romance <IR> GREYSLAER </IR> (1849), dramatized by an anonymous author in the same year.
MacMichael wrote The Kentucky Tragedy (1838); and Charles Fenno Hoffman treated the same story in his romance Greyslaer (1849).
Beauchampe: or, The Kentucky Tragedy (1842), also based on local history, deals with seduction, desertion, and revenge.
Also included in the series known as " the Border Romances " are The Yemassee and The Cassique of Kiawah (1859), in which Indians figure prominently, and two novels based on the Kentucky Tragedy: Beauchampe (1842) and its sequel, Charlemont (1846).
Poe took the plot of his play from a murder case known as the "Kentucky Tragedy." His scene is Italy, the lover who takes revenge is not yet the husband of the injured heroine, and the medium is blank verse.
After At Heaven's Gate (1943), he published his two best - known books, All the King's Men and World Enough and Time (1950), a historical novel based on the Kentucky Tragedy. Other novels include Band of Angels (1955), a story of miscegenation in the Civil War era; The Cave (1959); Wilderness (1961), about a Bavarian Jew in the Civil War; Flood (1964); Meet Me in the Green Glen (1971); and A Place to Come To (1977).

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