Kepler's star

Kepler's star

A supernova that was observed in Oct. 1604 in the constellation Ophiuchus and could be seen with the naked eye for over a year. It was studied by astronomers in Europe, China, and Korea and its position was so accurately determined by Kepler and Fabricius that a small patch of nebulosity above the galactic plane could be identified as the remnant of the original 1604 supernova (Walter Baade, 1943). The light curve plotted from the original observations shows that the magnitude increased to a maximum of over –2.5, dropping to +4 in about 300 days, and that it was a type Ia supernova.
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This set of five highlights some of mankind's greatest achievements: Thomas Edison's Light Filament; Johannes Kepler's Star, Michael Faraday's Magnetic Field; Robert Stephenson's Railway Sleepers; and Benjamin Franklin's Kite.
Kepler's star is also relatively young as it rotates twice as fast as the sun, meaning it has not had long to slow down.
But Kepler's star field is overly rambunctious, with natural brightness fluctuations much greater than expected for stars like the sun, says Jon Jenkins of the SETI Institute in Mountain View, Calif.
Kepler's Star appeared after 1603's fiery trigon conjunction in Sagittarius.
Johannes Kepler first sighted the supernova eight days later, but so thorough was his study of the "new" star that it has come to be known as Kepler's Star.
If the candidates were randomly distributed among Kepler's stars, only a handful would have more than one planet candidate.