kernel

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kernel

1. the edible central part of a seed, nut, or fruit within the shell or stone
2. the grain of a cereal, esp wheat, consisting of the seed in a hard husk

Kernel

 

in mathematics, a function K(x, y) that defines the integral transformation

which transforms the function f(y) into the function ɸ(x). The theory of such transformations is connected with the theory of linear integral equations.

kernel

[′kərn·əl]
(atomic physics)
An atom that has been stripped of its valence electrons, or a positively charged nucleus lacking the outermost orbital electrons.
(botany)
The inner portion of a seed.
A whole grain or seed of a cereal plant, such as corn or barley.
(computer science)
A computer program that must be modified before it can be used on a particular computer.
The programs that form the most essential part of a computer's operating system.
(mathematics)
For any mapping ƒ from a group A to a group B, the kernel of ƒ, denoted ker ƒ, is the set of all elements a of A such that ƒ(a) equals the identity element of B.
For a homomorphism h from a group G to a group H, this consists of all elements of G which h sends to the identity element of H.
For Fredholm and Volterra integral equations, this is the function K (x, t).
For an integral transform, the function K (x, t) in the transformation which sends the function ƒ(x) to the function ∫ K (x,t)ƒ(t) dt = F (x).

kernel

(Note: NOT "kernal").

1. <operating system> The essential part of Unix or other operating systems, responsible for resource allocation, low-level hardware interfaces, security etc. See also microkernel.

2. <language> An essential subset of a programming language, in terms of which other constructs are (or could be) defined. Also known as a core language.

kernel

The nucleus of an operating system. It is the closest part to the machine level and may activate the hardware directly or interface to another software layer that drives the hardware. The kernel orchestrates the entire operation of the computer by slicing time for each system function and each application as well as managing all the computer's resources. It typically resides in memory at all times. See microkernel, monolithic kernel, kernel space and kernel panic.
References in periodicals archive ?
kernel oil at four different concentrations, 5, 10, 15 and 20% (B1, B2, B3 and B4) and referenced with a control (100% watermelon oil).
Conceptually, this kernel is a special case of convolution kernels [9], so we have the following definition of convolution kernel style.
University of Utah experiments with GPU-acceleration in Linux kernel
Clean kernels from each post-harvest pod handling were divided into four, 3 kg lots and each lot placed in interlaced polypropylene bag (516 [cm.
Large differences in the numbers of kernels per spikelet were observed between hulled and naked genotypes.
Stored in every kernel are starch and a bit of moisture.
Peel back some of the layers of husks and look for plump, firm, medium kernels with milky fluid (puncture a kernel one with your fingernail to test; watery liquid indicates immature corn) that are not dry or shriveled.
All of the larvae survived when provided with a diet of all broken corn kernels, 81 percent survived on a diet that contained 5 percent broken kernels, and 28 percent survived on a diet that contained only whole corn kernels.
Kernel methods have long been established as effective techniques in the framework of machine learning and pattern recognition, and have now become the standard approach to many remote sensing applications.
Twenty-five kernels from positions 1 and 4 (Heiniger et al.
Estimate: What will the mass of the popped kernels be?
Blanching destroyed 95 percent of the disflavoring enzymes in kernels and 68 percent of the enzymes in the cob of cored corn, almost double those destroyed by the traditional approach.