Hagiographa

(redirected from Ketuvim)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Wikipedia.
Related to Ketuvim: Nevi'im

Hagiographa

the third of the three main parts into which the books of the Old Testament are divided in Jewish tradition (the other two parts being the Law and the Prophets), comprising Psalms, Proverbs, Job, the Song of Solomon, Ruth, Lamentations, Ecclesiastes, Esther, Daniel, Ezra, Nehemiah, and Chronicles
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
In the Middle Ages and in early modern times, sermons typically started with some part of the Writings or Ketuvim (Proverbs being the most popular in medieval times), which was then interpreted and applied to the Torah portion for the week.
(3) Tanakh is an acronym for the Hebrew names comprising the three sections of Jewish scripture: Torah; Nevi'im (Prophets); and Ketuvim (Writings).
He has now added the remaining four books of what is, rather confusingly, called the Chumash (Hebrew), the Pentateuch (Greek), or, quite simply, the Five Books of Moses; that is, the first, and arguably most important, portion of what Jews know as the Tanakh (an acronym for Torah, Neviim, and Ketuvim : Torah or "rule," Prophets, and "Writings").
These begin with the Torah, or the five books of Moses, and the remainder of the Hebrew Bible, which consists of two additional sections called Nevi'im (Prophets) and Ketuvim (Writings).
The Jewish sequence is Torah, Prophets (Neviim), and the Writings (Ketuvim).
Leaving these doubts aside, we turn to the main focus of the monograph, which is an analysis of what the author terms "allusions" to each of the three segments of the Bible: the Torah, Nevi im, and Ketuvim. It is here that Campbell's special approach comes to light.
It is part of the third section of the biblical canon known as the Ketuvim ("Writings").
He has published over 100 scholarly articles, primarily in Tanakh, and is the author or editor of ten books, most recently Vision from the Prophet and Counsel from the Elders: A Survey of Nevi'im and Ketuvim (OU Press, 2013).
The oldest surviving manuscript of the Ketuvim, or 'Writings,' which includes the Hebrew Psalms, is dated between 175--164 BCE.
Legal proof-texts are not derived from Psalms, or for that matter, from the Prophets (the nevi-im) or the Writings (the ketuvim).