key escrow


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key escrow

(security)
A controversial arrangement where the keys needed to decrypt encrypted data must be held in escrow by a third party so that government agencies can obtain them to decrypt messages which they suspect to be relevant to national security.

key escrow

In cryptography, placing a secret key into the hands of a trusted third party. See key management.
References in periodicals archive ?
IBE has the key escrow problem that the PKG could see any message because all private keys used in decryption are generated by it.
In this paper, we propose a practical approach to solving key escrow problem of P2MIBBE.
More importantly, it does not suffer from certificate management burden and key escrow problem.
1, which, as proposed, continued restrictions on exported encryption technology to enforce mandatory key escrow.
The amended EAR regulations allow licenses for: (1) mass market distribution after a one-time review if the technology incorporates 40-bit or less key lengths;(67) (2) products that incorporate key escrow and key recovery processes, provided the Bureau of Export Administration ("BXA") approves the process;(68) and (3) products that do not incorporate key escrow or key recovery processes, provided (i) no greater than 56-bit key length, and (ii) the company submits a business plan that details the steps that will be taken within two years to incorporate key recovery into all future exported products.
Privacy advocates are skeptical of the impact government-supported key escrow will have on their personal privacy.
The key escrow encryption initiative is enshrouded in controversy.
Bob Goodlatte (R-VA) and Zoe Lofgren (D-CA), would permit unlimited domestic use of any encryption product and prohibit the federal government from imposing a key escrow system (designed to allow government access to encrypted material).
Cullinan added that the speculation was ironic since Microsoft has consistently opposed the various key escrow proposals suggested by the government "because we don't believe they are good for consumers, the industry or national security.
On the subject of key escrow, which would provide security services with a back-door to confidential communications, the report said: "We can see no benefits arising from Government promotion of key escrow or key recovery technology.
Schiller (MIT), Bruce Schneier (Counterpane Systems), and I - issued a report "The Risks of Key Recovery, Key Escrow, and Trusted Third-Party Encryption" May 27, 1997 (see http://www.