Khachkar


Also found in: Wikipedia.
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Khachkar

 

(Armenian, “cross-stone”), a medieval Armenian monument, memorial or otherwise, consisting of vertically placed stone slabs with the carved image of a large cross of complex ornamental composition. Khachkars were erected both separately and in groups. They became common in the ninth century and were probably derived from early Christian stelae. Originally monumental in composition, they were later ornamented with delicate openwork patterns in the 12th century.

REFERENCES

Armianskie khachkary. Echmiadzin, 1973. (In Armenian, Russian, and English.)
The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
We dusted it off and staring back at us was a 10th-century Khachkar."
RAA's careful study of the structure found numerous church stones inside its walls and 133 Khachkar fragments.
For a thousand years the rolling hills around the town of Jugha in Azerbaijan's territory held a prospect of massive pink, red and grey Cross Stones, or "Khachkars." These are a sacred Armenian art form of sculptured crosses set into the face of massive stone blocks and surrounded by an array of symbolism and arabesque ornamentation.
For nearly 2000 years Khachkars have followed the Armenian presence; 40,000 are scattered across modern Armenia.
"We were particularly interested in knowing if we could find Khachkars inside Turkey," says Samvel Karapetian.