Khaki Campbell

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Khaki Campbell

 

a breed of ducks raised for meat and eggs that was developed in the 19th century in Great Britain by a poultry farmer named Campbell. Campbell crossed local ducks with Indian runners and Rouens. The body is cylindrical, with the front part slightly erect. The females are brownish gray, and the males bluish brown, with a black head. The males weigh about 2.2 kg, and the females about 2 kg. At two months the young weigh about 1.7 kg. Egg production is 180 to 220 per year; an egg weighs 80 g. The breed is raised in several countries, including Great Britain and the Netherlands. In the USSR it was used in developing speculum ducks.

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| Ducks are a great slug predator - Khaki Campbells or Indian Runners are reputed to be the best.
We had Khaki Campbells for a couple of years, and they flew over our 3-foot fence almost daily.
Khaki Campbell--Developed in 1898 in England as a result of a cross between an Indian Runner and Rouen, Khaki Campbells are an upright, medium-sized breed sporting a pretty buff, almost caramel coloration.
Khaki Campbell, they're a little larger bird, with a charming personality and a similar egg-laying capability.
"With ducks you might have thought it would be the egg-layers like Khaki Campbells, but in fact they are choosing more traditional breeds like their grandparents might have kept," said Mr Page.
I had been there last year and bought our first two Khaki Campbells. (If you like ducks, try these; they really do lay 365 eggs a year.) I was looking for a drake for my ducks.
Originally bred by Group Captain Leslie Bonnet in Herefordshire at the end of WW11, the breed owes its existence to chance mutations in his flock of Khaki Campbells.
When Duke would move around them they would run right over her (even Khaki Campbells were bigger than she was at the time but she was trying hard).