Khalkha


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The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Khalkha

 

the name of Northern Mongolia from the 16th to early 20th centuries. (The name also came to be applied to the local population.) Khalkha is now the Mongolian People’s Republic.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Manchus, a tribal group which conquered China in 1644 and formed the Qing dynasty, were able to bring Mongolia under Manchu control in 1691 as Outer Mongolia when the Khalkha Mongol nobles swore an oath of allegiance to the Manchu emperor.
There is a striking resemblance of Uyghur buya and Khalkha Mongolian buya; however, the word is certainly not borrowed from Khalkha; rather, the low vowel in Uyghur buya is the result of an internal Turkic development, while the sound written <a> in the second syllable of the Khalkha word reflects an internal Mongolic devel opment (28) (Posch 1964: 124).
Vowel harmony in Khalkha Mongolian, Yaka, Finnish, and Hungarian.
Ethnic Mongols account for about 95% of Mongolia's population and consist of Khalkha and other groups, all distinguished primarily by dialects of the Mongol language.
It is interesting to see what was written about Taranatha Kunga Nyingpo's recognition in Khalkha in the biography of his incarnation, Zanabazar.
These languages are associated by the fact that they have been in contact with one another and in contact with the same non-Tungusic languages, especially Mandarin Chinese, Khalkha Mongolian, and Dagur (also Mongolic).
Despite the Tsar's refusal of support, major political developments in Outer Mongolia, such as the proclamation of independence of Outer Mongolia by the Khalkha Mongols on 1 December 1911 and ceremonially enthronement of Jetsun Dampa, the Grand Lama of Urga, as Mongolia's sovereign ruler on 29th December of the same year; expulsion of Chinese Ambans, together with their escorts from the four main Khalkha Mongolian provinces took place.
Ethnic groups (2004): 85% Mongol (predominantly Khalkha); 7% Turkic (largest group, Kazakh); 4.6% Tungusic; and 3.4% others, including Chinese and Russian.
On other hand, the Nation of Mongols, in early 15th century, was split between the Oirat in the Altay Mountains region and the eastern group that later came to be known as the Khalkha in the northern area of the Gobi desert.
Ethnic groups (2004): 85% Mongol (predominantly Khalkha), 7% Turkic (largest group, Kazakh) 4.6% Tungusic, and 3.4% others, including Chinese and Russian.
The Long Song of the Khalkhas mirrors the steppe's untiring winds,
Cultural performers are taking centre stage in the participating shopping malls with international troupes such as the Mexican Aztecs, Mongolian Khalkhas, Papua New Guinea Hulis, Kenyan Maasais, New Zealand Maoris and Botswanian Khoisans entertaining with their unique ritual dances.