Khamriyyat

The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Khamriyyat

 

in Arabic literature, poetry devoted to the praise of wine, intoxication, and the pleasures of the table. Verses on this theme appeared in the very earliest period of pre-Islamic Arabic literature, originally as a section of the qasida, and reached their highest development in the works of Abu Nu-was (762–815), evolving as a distinct genre expressing the author’s extreme pro-Iranian sentiments. In New Persian and Tadzhik poetry, the khamriyyat theme appeared in the works of Ru-daki and his contemporaries. It was later developed in the divans of the 11th-century poets Farrukhi and especially Manuchehri, who glorified gastronomic pleasures in a song cycle composed in the unique strophic form musammat. The theme of wine acquired allegorical significance in Sufi poetry. Saki-nameh, short poems in praise of wine, are a special type of khamriyyat.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Abu Nuwas, born in Ahwaz of a Persian mother, employs Persian in a variety of genres, including hunting poems (tardiyyat) and wine poems (khamriyyat).
"Khamriyyat Abu Nawas" -- the wine song of Abu Nawas, comes out of Youssef's latest album, "Abu Nawas Rhapsody," released in the UK this Monday.