Kharosthi

The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Kharosthi

 

an Indo-Bactrian writing system, which developed from the Aramaic alphabet. Kharosthi is a syllabic writing system and is read from right to left (in later inscriptions, from left to right). Kharosthi was influenced by the Old Indian Brahmi writing system. The oldest inscription in the Kharosthi alphabet (a translation of the edict of Asoka), dating from circa 251 B.C., was found in 1836 in Shahbazgarhi, on the border of India and Afghanistan. Other inscriptions have been discovered in Loulan (Sinkiang), eastern Afghanistan, and northern Punjab; the latest of these date from the fourth and fifth centuries A.D.

REFERENCES

Bühler, G. Indische Palaeographie. Strasbourg, 1896.
The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
These coins carried legends in both Greek and Kharosthi. The legends on his coins read the following: Maharaja Tratarasa Menadrasa.
He said that despite the passage of centuries, inscriptions in the Kharosthi script are still intact at the bottom of some of the stupas which feature the names and titles of their donors.
Incidentally, Ali knows more than 15 languages, including Arabic, Ugaritic, Hebrew, Brahmi, Greek, Nabataean, Phoenician and Kharosthi. "It is all due to my interest in books on history, mythology and languages.
Thus, they implemented early Brahmi, Kharosthi and Buddhist texts.
The Persian scribes brought into India a form of writing which came to be known as Kharosthi script.
A New Version of the Gandhari Dharmapada and a Collection of Previous-Birth Stories: British Library Kharosthi Fragments 16 + 25.
Extensive training on ancient scripts such as Brahmi, Kharosthi, Grantha, Takri, Modi, Nandinagari, Sarada, and Tigalari is needed to enable scholars to decipher and read the content of manuscripts.
He further observes that at about 250 AD -d- and perhaps -t- still turned up in Kharosthi documents of Khotan where also the clusters with sibilants and clusters with stops and -r- survived.
(5) Perhaps the western Sumpa: the Sobyi of the so-called prophesy of the Li country or the Supiya from the Central Asian Kharosthi documents (cf.
This script utilizes the Kharosthi alphabet, but expressed in Greek letters, and the actual language is perhaps a Sakan variant that may have been spoken by the Kushans.
Four Gandhari Samyuktagama sutras; Senior Kharosthi fragment 5.
they also began to use Indian months and Kharosthi script.