Khirbet Qumran


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Related to Khirbet Qumran: Qumrun, Wadi Qumran

Khirbet Qumran

an archaeological site in NW Jordan, near the NW shore of the Dead Sea: includes the caves where the Dead Sea Scrolls were found
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Khirbet Qumran

 

the remains of a settlement of the Qumran religious community, which existed from the late first millennium B.C. to A.D. 68. The site is located in the area of Wadi Qumran on the western shore of the Dead Sea. The Dead Sea scrolls were discovered in caves near Khirbet Qumran.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
ClauBen, "Die Identifizierung der Grabungsstatte Khirbet Qumran: Eine forschungsgeschichtliche Annaherung" (pp.
Zangenberg, "Zwischen Zufall und Einzigartigkeit: Bemerkungen zur jlingsten Diskussion iiber die Funktion von Khirbet Qumran und die Rolle einiger ausgewahlter archaologischer Befunde" (pp.
First, whereas de Vaux considered the excavated Khirbet Qumran to be the remains of a sectarian settlement, the community center of Essene Jews whose scrolls were found in the caves, several scholars in the 1980s and 1990s disagreed with his understanding of the site and interpreted it otherwise: as a villa rustica (R.
Discoveries prefixed with KhQ (Khirbet Qumran) or Arch are not indexed here, remains from Wadis Nar and Ghweir have not yet been published, and many published documents have no identifiable words.
Uncovered between 1947 and 1956 in 11 caves near Khirbet Qumran, and dating approximately to 250 BCE to 68 CE, the scrolls are one of the greatest archaeological finds of all time.
Other theories suggest the manuscripts have little or no connection to Khirbet Qumran, and may be more mainstream than previously thought.
In his new book, Professor Yizhar Hirschfeld of the Hebrew University of Jerusalem's Institute of Archaeology attempts to sum up systematically the accumulation of archaeological research relating to Khirbet Qumran. The work consists of five chapters.
Khirbet Qumran is a unique site due to the fact that in addition to silent artifacts of the type well known from other Second Temple sites, around nine hundred scrolls were discovered in eleven caves surrounding the site.
Donceel, "Reprise des travaux de publication des fouilles au Khirbet Qumran," Revue Biblique 99 (1992): 557-73.
Donceel-Voute "Coenaculum-La salle a l'etage du locus 30 i Khirbet Qumran sur la Mer Morte," Banquets de l'Orient=Res Orientals 4 (1992): 61-84.
Standing in the ancient settlement of Khirbet Qumran on the shores of the Dead Sea, a teenager with a good arm could throw a stone into Cave 4.
At the conference, Roland de Vaux, the first scholar to excavate the site of Khirbet Qumran and the head of an international team appointed to decipher the newly discovered Dead Sea Scrolls, made an urgent plea for funding.