Khorsabad

Khorsabad

(khôrsäbäd`), village, NE Iraq, near the Tigris River and 12 mi (20 km) NE of Mosul. It is built on the site of Dur Sharrukin, an Assyrian city (founded 8th cent. B.C. by SargonSargon,
d. 705 B.C., king of Assyria (722–705 B.C.), successor to Shalmaneser V. He completed Shalmaneser's siege of Samaria in 721 B.C., thus destroying the northern Israelite kingdom forever. In 720 he defeated a coalition of enemies at Raphia.
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), which covered 1 sq mi (2.6 sq km). Its mounds were excavated by P. E. BottaBotta, Paul Émile
, 1805–70, French archaeologist and government official. While consular agent at Mosul (1843) he made his renowned discoveries of Assyrian inscriptions at Khorsabad.
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 in 1842 and in 1851, and statues of Sargon and of huge, winged bulls that guarded the gates of the royal palace were taken to the Louvre. In 1932 there were discovered hundreds of cuneiform tablets in the Elamite language and a list of kings ruling from c.2200 B.C. to 730 B.C. Excavated ruins there were looted and razed in 2015 by the Islamist extremist group Islamic StateIslamic State
(IS), Sunni Islamic militant group committed to the establishment of an Islamic caliphate that would unite Muslims in a transnational, strict-fundamentalist Islamic state.
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.
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References in periodicals archive ?
On entering Room 1 and turning to the left, a visitor would have seen in the middle of the room two successive architectural models: the Sibitti temple of Sargon II at Khorsabad (foreground) and Sennacherib's aqueduct at Jerwan (Fig.
Meanwhile, Al-Shammari told KUNA that IS has managed to destroy historical evidence of four important historic sites in the province: Nimrud, as capital of the Assyrian empire in the 13th century BC, Nineveh, the capital of Assyrian king Sennacherib and Khorsabad, capital of King Sargon II, both in the seventh century BC, and finally (Al-Hadhar), as the capital of Arab kings in the second century AD.
Daesh still controls other Assyrian landmarks including the ruins of Nineveh and Khorsabad, as well as the 2,000-year-old desert city of Hatra, famed for its pillared temple which blended Graeco-Roman and eastern architecture.
Baghdad / NINA / Sources from within the province of Nineveh confirmed that wave of violent raids on Daesh sites in Noran, Ba'shiqah, Khorsabad, Tilkaif and Hamdania accompanied by heavy artillery shelling.
Destroyed or damaged by ISIS have been the eye wateringly haunting ancient sites in or near Mosul (dating back to 25th century BC), 3rd or second century BC in Northern Iraq: Hatra, 3rd or 2nd century BC; Nineveh, the Assyrian Capital; Nimrud, founded 3,500 years ago; Khorsabad, built between 717 -706 BC; the 4th century Mar Behnam Monastry.
12, 2015, 5:01 PM), http://news.nationalgeographic.com/2015/03/150312-isis-destruction-looting-ancient-sites-iraq-syriaarchaeology/ (observing that militants representing the Islamic State destroyed sites at Nimrud, Khorsabad, and Hatra, following well-publicized attacks on displayed artifacts at Mosul Museum); Susannah Cullinane, Hamdi Alkhshali & Mohammed Tawfeeq, Tracking a Trail of Historical Obliteration: ISIS Trumpets Destruction of Nimrud, CNN (Apr.
The same week, ISIS posted equally graphic footage of the decimation by explosives of the 2,000-year-old ruins of the Assyrian city of Khorsabad and much of nearby Mosul (including its archaeological museum), whose suburbs contain the biblical Mesopotamian city of Nineveh.
Islamic State fighters have desecrated ancient Assyrian and Graeco-Roman palaces in northern Iraq including the 2,700-year-old Assyrian capital of Khorsabad.
At the same time, Denselow added, the IS are continuing their path of cultural destruction and billing their action as a "war on history." They've taken a similar course in Iraq, where they've destroyed antique sites like Nineveh and Khorsabad.
Tadmor attaches special importance here to a relief from the palace of Sargon II at Khorsabad depicting his siege of "the fortified city of Mannea," in 715 BCE.
- Ier siecle de notre ere) le 7 mars, monumentale cite parthe, Khorsabad (nord de Mossoul) pillee le 8 mars, et enfin Ninive, la derniere capitale assyrienne.